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Этюд в багровых тонах / A Study in Scarlet

Этюд в багровых тонах / A Study in Scarlet
Этюд в багровых тонах / A Study in Scarlet Arthur Conan Doyle Легко читаем по-английски В ваших руках произведение знаменитого писателя Артура Конана Дойла – «Этюд в багровых тонах», которое в итоге и положило начало целой серии рассказов под названием «Приключения Шерлока Холмса». Бывший военный врач Джон Ватсон, прибывает в Лондон, где знакомится с Шерлоком Холмсом – знаменитым сыщиком, который благодаря своему дедуктивному методу способен раскрыть даже самое тупиковое дело. Их приключения начинаются с загадочного убийства, на месте которого было найдено золотое кольцо и слово RACHE, написанное на стене кровью. Текст адаптирован для продолжающих изучение английского языка (уровень 2). В формате PDF A4 сохранен издательский макет книги. Артур Конан Дойл Этюд в багровых тонах / A Study in Scarlet © Матвеев С. А., адаптация текста, комментарии, словарь, 2021 © ООО «Издательство АСТ», 2021 Arthur Conan Doyle A Study in Scarlet Part I Chapter I Mr. Sherlock Holmes In the year 1878 I took my degree of Doctor of Medicine of the University of London, and proceeded to Netley to take the course for surgeons in the army. I completed my studies there, and became Assistant Surgeon[1 - Assistant Surgeon – ассистент хирурга]. I came to the Berkshires[2 - the Berkshires – Беркширский полк], with whom I served at the fatal battle. There I was struck on the shoulder[3 - I was struck on the shoulder – я был ранен в плечо] by a bullet, which shattered the bone. I was so weak that they sent me back to England. I had neither friends nor relatives in England. I came to London. There I stayed for some time at a private hotel. One day I was at a bar, when someone tapped me on the shoulder. I turned round and recognized Stamford. The sight of a friendly face in London is a pleasant thing to a lonely man. I asked him to lunch with me, and we went together in a hansom. “Whatever are you doing, Watson?” he asked, as we rattled through the London streets. “You are as thin as a lath.” “Looking for lodgings.” I answered. “I want to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price.” “That’s strange,” remarked my companion; “you are the second man today who says so.” “And who is the first?” I asked. “A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory. He cannot get someone for the nice rooms which he found, and which were too much for his purse.” “Oh!” I cried, “if he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I can be his partner.” Stamford looked at me. “You don’t know Sherlock Holmes yet,” he said. “What is there against him?” “Oh, I didn’t say there was anything against him. But he is an enthusiast in some branches of science. Anyway, he is a decent fellow enough.” “I want to meet him,” I said. “How can I meet this friend of yours?” “He is at the laboratory, I think” said my companion. “If you like, we can meet him after luncheon.” “Certainly,” I answered. We turned down a narrow lane and passed through a small side-door. Then we ascended the bleak stone staircase. Near the further end a passage led to the chemical laboratory. This was a lofty chamber with countless bottles. Broad, low tables were scattered about. There was only one man in the room, who was bending over a table. He was absorbed in his work. Suddenly he sprang to his feet with a cry of pleasure. “Great!” he shouted to my companion. “Look! It is a re-agent which is precipitated by hemoglobin[4 - which is precipitated by hemoglobin – который осаждается гемоглобином], and by nothing else.” “Dr. Watson, Mr. Sherlock Holmes,” said Stamford. “How are you?” he said cordially. “You visited Afghanistan, I see.” “How did you know that?” I asked in astonishment. “Never mind,” said he, chuckling to himself. “The question now is about hemoglobin. Do you see the significance of this discovery?” “It is interesting, no doubt,” I answered, “but practically…” “It is the most practical discovery for years. It gives us an infallible test for blood stains. Come over here now!” He drew me over to the table. “Let us have some fresh blood,” he said. He dug a long bodkin into his finger, and drew off the drop of blood in a chemical pipette. “Now, I add this small quantity of blood to water. You perceive that the mixture has the appearance of pure water. The proportion of blood is one in a million. However, we shall be able to obtain the characteristic reaction.” He threw into the vessel a few white crystals, and then added some drops of a transparent fluid. In an instant the contents changed its colour. “Ha! ha!” he cried. He was as delighted as a child with a new toy. “What do you think of that? It acts as well whether the blood is old or new. Hundreds of criminals will pay the penalty of their crimes.” “Indeed!” I murmured. “For example, we see brownish stains upon the criminal’s clothes. Are they blood stains, or mud stains, or rust stains, or fruit stains, or what are they? That is a question which puzzles many experts, and why? Because there was no reliable test. Now we have the Sherlock Holmes’ test!” His eyes glittered as he spoke, and he put his hand over his heart and bowed. “Congratulations,” I remarked. I was surprised at his enthusiasm. “I can name many cases in which this test will be decisive.” “We came here on business[5 - on business – по делу],” said Stamford. He sat down on a high three-legged stool, and pushed another one in my direction with his foot. “My friend is looking for a room, and you were complaining that you could get no one to share expenses with you. So, I bring you together.” Sherlock Holmes seemed delighted. “I know a good suite in Baker Street,” he said. “You don’t mind the smell of strong tobacco, I hope?” “I smoke myself,” I answered. “That’s good. I have chemicals, and occasionally do experiments. Will that annoy you?” “By no means.” “Moreover, at times I don’t open my mouth for days. You must not think I am sulky when I do that. And what about you? It’s better for two fellows to know one another before they begin to live together.” I laughed. “I have a bull pup[6 - bull pup – щенок бульдога],” I said, “I hate noise, and I am extremely lazy. I have other vices, but those are the principal ones.” “Is the violin-playing some noise for you?” he asked, anxiously. “It depends on the player,” I answered. “Oh, that’s all right,” he cried, with a merry laugh. “I think we may begin to live together, if the rooms are agreeable to you.” “When shall we see them?” “Come to me at noon tomorrow, and we’ll go there together,” he answered. “All right – noon exactly,” said I. We left him working among his chemicals, and we walked together towards my hotel. “By the way,” I asked suddenly, “how did he know that I had come from Afghanistan?” My companion smiled. “That’s his little peculiarity,” he said. “Oh! a mystery?” I cried. “This is very piquant.” Stamford bade me good-bye. “I think he knows more about you than you about him. Good-bye.” “Good-bye,” I answered, and strolled on to my hotel. Chapter II The Science of Deduction We met next day and inspected the rooms at No. 221B, Baker Street. They consisted of a couple of comfortable bed-rooms and a single large sitting-room, with two broad windows. The apartments were desirable in every way. That evening I moved my things from the hotel, and on the following morning Sherlock Holmes followed me with several boxes and portmanteaus. Holmes was certainly not a difficult man to live with. He was quiet, and his habits were regular. He breakfasted and went out early in the morning. Sometimes he spent his day at the chemical laboratory, sometimes in the dissecting-rooms[7 - dissecting-rooms – анатомический театр], and occasionally in long walks. Sometimes he was lying upon the sofa in the sitting-room, and he was not uttering a word or moving a muscle from morning to night. As the weeks went by, my interest in him gradually deepened and increased. In height he was rather over six feet, and excessively lean. His eyes were sharp and piercing; and his hawk-like nose was very thin. His chin marked the man of determination. His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he knew nothing. And my surprise reached a climax, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. “You will be astonished,” he said, smiling. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.” “To forget it!” “You see,” he explained, “a man’s brain is like a little empty attic. A fool brings there all the lumber of every sort that he sees. But a wise man is very careful as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him to do his work.” “But the Solar System!” I protested. “What is it to me?” he interrupted impatiently; “you say that we go round the sun. If we go round the moon it will not make difference to me or to my work.” During the first week or so we had no visitors, and I thought that my companion was a friendless man. Presently, however, I found that he had many acquaintances in different classes of society. There was one little sallow rat-faced[8 - rat-faced – с крысиной физиономией], dark-eyed fellow, Mr. Lestrade, who came three or four times in a single week. One morning a young girl arrived, and stayed for half an hour or more. On another occasion an old white-haired gentleman had an interview with my companion; and on another a railway porter[9 - railway porter – вокзальный носильщик] in his velveteen uniform. When these individuals came, Sherlock Holmes asked me to go to my bed-room. He always apologized to me for this inconvenience. “I use this room as a place of business,” he said, “and these people are my clients.” It was on the 4th of March. I rose earlier than usual. I rang the bell and gave our landlady a signal that I was ready. Then I picked up a magazine from the table. One of the articles had a pencil mark, and I began to read it. Its ambitious title was “The Book of Life,” and it attempted to show how much an observant man might learn by an accurate and systematic examination of everything. For me, it was a remarkable mixture of shrewdness and of absurdity. The writer claimed by a momentary expression, a twitch of a muscle or a glance of an eye, to fathom a man’s inmost thoughts. Observation and analysis! That’s all. “From a drop of water,” said the writer, “a logician[10 - logician – человек, способный логически мыслить] can infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara. All life is a great chain. Like all other arts, the Science of Deduction and Analysis requires long and patient study to attain the highest possible perfection in it. By a man’s finger nails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouser knees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt cuffs – by each of these things a man’s life is plainly revealed.” “What ineffable twaddle!” I cried and slapped the magazine down on the table, “I never read such rubbish in my life.” “What is it?” asked Sherlock Holmes. “This article,” I said. “It irritates me. It is not practical. Let’s bring that author to a carriage on the underground, and ask to give the trades of all the travellers. I will lay a thousand to one against him.” “And you will lose your money,” Sherlock Holmes remarked calmly. “As for the article[11 - as for the article – что касается статьи] I wrote it myself.” “You!” “Yes. The theories which are chimerical to you, are really extremely practical – so practical that I depend upon them for my bread and cheese[12 - bread and cheese – кусок хлеба с маслом].” “And how?” I asked involuntarily. “Well, I’m a consulting detective, if you can understand what that is. Here in London we have lots of Government detectives and lots of private ones. When these fellows don’t know what to do, they come to me, and I help them. You saw Mr. Lestrade, he is a well-known detective. But sometimes even he doesn’t know what to do.” “And these other people?” “They are people who are in trouble about something. I listen to their story, they listen to my comments, and then I earn some money.” “But do you mean to say,” I said, “that you here can unravel some knot which other men can’t?” “Quite so. I have intuition. You see I have a lot of special knowledge which I apply to the problem, and which facilitates matters wonderfully. The rules of deduction in that article which aroused your scorn, are invaluable to me in practical work. You were surprised when I told you about Afghanistan.” “Someone told you about it, no doubt.” “Nothing of the sort. I knew you came from Afghanistan. What did I think? Here is a gentleman of a medical type, but with the air of a military man. Clearly an army doctor, then. He came from the tropics, for his face is dark, and that is not the natural tint of his skin, for his wrists are fair. He underwent hardship and sickness, as his haggard face says clearly. His left arm is injured. Where did an English army doctor meet all this? Clearly in Afghanistan. I then remarked that you came from Afghanistan, and you were astonished.” “It is simple enough as you explain it,” I said. “You remind me of Edgar Allen Poe’s Dupin[13 - Edgar Allen Poe’s Dupin – Дюпен из романов Эдгара Алана По].” Sherlock Holmes rose and lit his pipe. “You think that you are complimenting me,” he observed. “Now, in my opinion, Dupin was a very inferior fellow. He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was not a phenomenon as Poe imagined.” “And what about Gaboriau’s works[14 - Gaboriau’s works – романы Габорио (о детективе Лекоке)]?” I asked. “What do you think of Lecoq? Is he a real detective?” Sherlock Holmes sniffed sardonically. “Lecoq was a miserable bungler,” he said, in an angry voice; “The question was how to identify an unknown prisoner. I can do it in twenty-four hours. Lecoq took six months or so. These books can teach the detectives what to avoid.” I walked over to the window, and looked out into the busy street. “This fellow may be very clever,” I said to myself, “but he is certainly very conceited.” “There are no crimes and no criminals in these days,” he said, querulously. “No use to have brains in our profession. I can make my name famous.” I was annoyed at his bumptious style of conversation. I decided to change the topic. “I wonder what that fellow is looking for?” I asked. A man was walking slowly down the other side of the street. He had a large blue envelope in his hand. “You mean the retired sergeant of Marines[15 - retired sergeant of Marines – отставной флотский сержант],” said Sherlock Holmes. “Oh!” thought I to myself. “He knows that I cannot verify his guess.” Suddenly the man saw the number on our door, and ran rapidly across the roadway. We heard a loud knock, a deep voice below, and heavy steps. “For Mr. Sherlock Holmes,” he said. He stepped into the room and handed my friend the letter. Here was an opportunity to check my companion’s words. “May I ask you,” I said, “what your trade may be?” “Commissionaire, sir,” he said, gruffly. “And you were?” I asked, with a malicious glance at my companion. “A sergeant, sir, Royal Marine Light Infantry[16 - Royal Marine Light Infantry – королевская морская пехота], sir.” Chapter III The Lauriston Garden Mystery This was the fresh proof of the practical nature of my companion’s theories. My respect for his powers of analysis increased wondrously. When I looked at him he was reading the note. “How did you deduce that?” I asked. “Deduce what?” said he, petulantly. “That he was a retired sergeant of Marines.” “I have no time for trifles,” he answered, brusquely; then with a smile, “Excuse my rudeness. So you actually were not able to see that that man was a sergeant of Marines?” “No, indeed.” “Even across the street I saw a great blue anchor tattooed on the back of his hand. He had a military carriage[17 - military carriage – военная выправка], and side whiskers. He was a man of self-importance and a certain air of command. You observed the way in which he held his head and swung his cane. A steady, respectable, middle-aged man – a sergeant.” “Wonderful!” I ejaculated. “That’s nothing,” said Holmes. “I said just now that there were no criminals. I am wrong – look at this!” He gave me the note. “Oh,” I cried, “this is terrible!” This is the letter: “My Dear Mr. Sherlock Holmes, “During the night at 3, Lauriston Gardens, off the Brixton Road, a policeman saw a light about two in the morning. The house was empty. He found the door open, and in the front room, which is bare of furniture, discovered the body of a gentleman. The gentleman was well dressed, and had cards in his pocket with the name of ‘Enoch J. Drebber, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A.’ The policeman saw no robbery. There are marks of blood in the room, but there is no wound upon his person. How did he come into the empty house; indeed, the whole affair is a puzzler. If you come round to the house any time before twelve, you will find me there. If you are unable to come I shall give you all the details. Please favour me with your opinion. Yours faithfully, Tobias Gregson.” “Gregson is the smartest of the policemen of the Scotland Yard,” my friend remarked; “he and Lestrade are both quick and energetic, but conventional.” “Surely there is not a moment to lose,” I cried, “shall I go and order you a cab?” “I’m not sure about whether I shall go. I am incurably lazy.” “Isn’t this your chance?” “My dear friend, if I unravel the whole matter, you may be sure that Gregson and Lestrade will pocket all the credit[18 - pocket all the credit – прикарманить себе всю славу]. However, we may go and have a look. Why not? Come on! Get your hat,” he said. “You wish me to come?” “Yes, if you have nothing better to do.” A minute later we were both in a hansom. We were driving furiously for the Brixton Road. It was a foggy, cloudy morning. My companion was talking about fiddles. As for myself, I was silent, for the dull weather depressed my spirits. Number 3, Lauriston Gardens, was one of four houses which stood back some little way from the street. Two of them were occupied and two were empty. There was a “To Let” card near the house. A small garden separated each of these houses from the street, and was traversed by a narrow pathway. It was yellowish in colour, and consisted of a mixture of clay and of gravel. The whole place was very sloppy from the night rain. Sherlock Holmes lounged up and down the pavement, and gazed vacantly at the ground, the sky, the opposite houses and the line of railings. Then he proceeded slowly down the path, or rather down the fringe of grass, and looked at the ground. Twice he stopped. He smiled, and uttered an exclamation of satisfaction. At the door of the house, a tall, white-faced, flaxen-haired[19 - flaxen-haired – с льняными волосами] man met us. He had a notebook in his hand. He rushed forward and wrung my companion’s hand with effusion. “It is indeed kind of you to come,” he said, “My colleague, Mr. Lestrade, is here.” Holmes glanced at me and raised his eyebrows sardonically. “With two such men as yourself and Lestrade here, I am useless,” he said. Gregson rubbed his hands. “I think,” he answered; “it’s a queer case, and I knew your taste for such things.” “You did not come here in a cab?” asked Sherlock Holmes. “No, sir.” “Nor Lestrade?” “No, sir.” “Then let us go and look at the room.” And Sherlock Holmes entered the house. A short passage led to the kitchen and offices. I saw two doors to the left and to the right. One of these was closed. The other belonged to the dining-room, where the mysterious affair occurred. Holmes walked in, and I followed him. It was a large square room without furniture. A vulgar paper adorned the walls. Opposite the door was a showy fireplace, surmounted by a mantelpiece. On one corner of this was the stump of a red wax candle. The window was so dirty that the light was hazy and uncertain. All these details I observed afterwards. A single grim motionless figure lay upon the floor. It was a man about forty-three or forty-four years of age, middle-sized, broad shouldered, with curling black hair, and a short stubbly beard. He was dressed in a frock coat[20 - frock coat – сюртук] and waistcoat, with light-coloured trousers. A top hat[21 - top hat – цилиндр] was placed upon the floor beside him. His hands were clenched and his arms thrown abroad[22 - thrown abroad – раскинуты], while his legs were interlocked[23 - legs were interlocked – ноги были скрючены]. On his rigid face there stood an expression of horror and of hatred. This malignant and terrible contortion, the low forehead, blunt nose, and prognathous jaw[24 - prognathous jaw – выступающая вперёд челюсть] gave the dead man an ape-like[25 - ape-like – обезьяноподобный] appearance. Lestrade was standing by the doorway, and greeted my companion and myself. Sherlock Holmes approached the body. He knelt down and examined it intently. “You are sure that there is no wound?” he asked. He pointed to numerous gouts and splashes of blood which lay all round. “Yes!” cried both detectives. “Then, of course, this blood belongs to somebody else, maybe to the murderer, if it is a murder?” As he spoke, his nimble fingers were flying here, there, and everywhere. They were feeling, pressing, unbuttoning, examining. Finally, he sniffed the dead man’s lips, and then glanced at the soles of his patent leather boots. “You can take him to the mortuary now,” he said. Four men entered the room, and they lifted and carried the stranger out. As they raised him, a ring tinkled down and rolled across the floor. Lestrade took it. “There was a woman here,” he cried. “It’s a woman’s wedding-ring.” He held it upon the palm of his hand. We all gazed at it. “This complicates matters,” said Gregson. “You’re sure it doesn’t simplify them?” observed Holmes. “What did you find in his pockets?” “Here,” said Gregson. “A gold watch, No. 97163, by Barraud[26 - by Barraud – фирмы Барро], of London. Gold chain, very heavy and solid. Gold ring, with masonic device. Gold pin – bull-dog’s head, with rubies as eyes. Russian leather card-case, with cards of Enoch J. Drebber of Cleveland. No purse, but seven pounds thirteen. Pocket edition of Boccaccio’s ‘Decameron,’[27 - Boccaccio’s ‘Decameron’ – «Декамерон» Бокаччо]with name of Joseph Stangerson upon the fly-leaf[28 - with name of Joseph Stangerson upon the fly-leaf – с именем Джозеф Стэнджерсон на форзаце]. Two letters – one addressed to E. J. Drebber and one to Joseph Stangerson.” “At what address?” “American Exchange, Strand – to be left till called for[29 - American Exchange, Strand – to be left till called for – Стрэнд, Американская биржа, до востребования]. They are both from the Guion Steamship Company[30 - Guion Steamship Company – пароходная компания «Гийон»], and refer to the boats from Liverpool. It is clear that this unfortunate man wanted to return to New York.” “What about this man, Stangerson?” “I sent advertisements to all the newspapers, sir,” said Gregson. “And one of my men went to the American Exchange.” “What about Cleveland?” “We telegraphed this morning.” “What were your inquiries?” “We simply detailed the circumstances, and said that we were glad to receive any information which could help us.” Sherlock Holmes chuckled to himself. Suddenly Lestrade reappeared. “Mr. Gregson,” he said, “I made a discovery of the highest importance! I carefully examined the walls. Come here. Now, stand there!” He struck a match on his boot. “Look at that!” he said, triumphantly. In the corner of the room, across the wall there was in blood-red letters a single word – RACHE. “What do you think of that?” cried the detective. “The murderer wrote it with his or her own blood. Why that corner? I will tell you. See that candle on the mantelpiece. It was the brightest corner of the room.” “And what does it mean?” asked Gregson. “Mean? It means that the writer was going to write the female name Rachel. But he or she had no time to finish. You can laugh, Mr. Sherlock Holmes. You may be very smart and clever, but the old hound is the best here!” “I really beg your pardon!” said my companion. “You are certainly the best. I had no time to examine this room, but with your permission I shall do so now.” And he whipped a tape measure[31 - tape measure – рулетка] and a large round magnifying glass[32 - magnifying glass – увеличительное стекло] from his pocket. With these two implements he trotted noiselessly about the room. Sometimes he stopped, occasionally knelt. For twenty minutes or more he continued his researches. In one place he gathered up very carefully a little pile of grey dust from the floor, and packed it in an envelope. Finally, he examined with his magnifying glass the word upon the wall. After that he was satisfied, for he replaced his tape and his glass in his pocket. Gregson and Lestrade watched the manoeuvres of Sherlock Holmes with considerable curiosity and some contempt. “What do you think of it, sir?” they both asked. “You are doing so well now,” remarked my friend. “that I can’t interfere.” There was sarcasm in his voice as he spoke. “If you let me know how your investigations go,” he continued, “I shall be happy to give you any help I can. But I want to speak to the constable who found the body. Can you give me his name and address?” “John Rance,” said Lestrade. “You will find him at 46, Audley Court, Kennington Park Gate.” “Come along, Doctor,” said Holmes; “we shall go to him. I’ll tell you one thing which may help you in the case,” he turned to the two detectives. “It was a murder, and the murderer was a man. He was more than six feet high, was in the prime of life[33 - in the prime of life – в расцвете лет], had small feet for his height, wore coarse, square-toed boots[34 - square-toed boots – ботинки с квадратными носками] and smoked a cigar. He came here with his victim in a four-wheeled cab, which was drawn by a horse with three old shoes and one new one on his off fore leg[35 - with three old shoes and one new one on his off fore leg – с тремя старыми и одной новой подковой на правом переднем копыте]. The murderer had a florid face, and the finger-nails of his right hand were remarkably long. These indications may assist you.” Lestrade and Gregson glanced at each other with an incredulous smile. “How was this man murdered?” asked they. “Poison,” said Sherlock Holmes curtly. “One other thing, Lestrade,” he added: “‘Rache,’ is the German for ‘revenge;’ so don’t look for Miss Rachel.” Chapter IV What John Rance Had to Tell It was one o’clock when we left No. 3, Lauriston Gardens. Sherlock Holmes led me to the nearest telegraph office, whence he dispatched a long telegram. He then hailed a cab, and ordered the driver to take us to the address which Lestrade gave us. “You amaze me, Holmes,” said I. “How do you know all those particulars of the case?” “Look,” he answered. “the first thing: a cab made two ruts with its wheels close to the curb. Now, up to last night, we had no rain. So those wheels – which left such a deep impression – were there during the night. There were the marks of the horse’s hoofs, too, the outline of one hoof was very clear. This was a new shoe. Since the cab was there after the rain began, and was not there at any time during the morning, it was there during the night, and, therefore, it brought those two men to the house.” “But how did you know the man’s height?” said I. “The height of a man is connected to the length of his stride. It is a simple calculation. I had this fellow’s stride both on the clay outside and on the dust within. Moreover: when a man writes on a wall, he usually writes about the level of his own eyes. That writing was just over six feet from the ground.” “And his age?” I asked. “Well, if a man can stride four and a half feet without the effort, he is strong enough. That was the breadth of a puddle on the garden walk which he jumped over. There is no mystery about it at all. I am simply applying to ordinary life some deduction. Is there anything else that puzzles you?” “The finger nails and the cigar,” I suggested. “The writing on the wall was done with a man’s forefinger dipped in blood. The plaster was scratched. This is impossible if the man’s nail is trimmed. I gathered up some ash from the floor. It was dark in colour and flakey – a cigar, for sure. I made a special study of cigar ashes – in fact, I wrote a monograph upon the subject.” “And the florid face?” I asked. “Ah, please don’t ask about it now, though I have no doubt that I was right.” “But, Holmes,” I remarked; “why did these two men – if there were two men – come into an empty house? How did the victim take poison? Where did the blood come from? What was the object of the murderer? What about the woman’s ring there? Why did the second man write the German word RACHE?” My companion smiled approvingly. “My dear Watson,” Holmes said, “many things are still obscure. About Lestrade’s discovery. Not a German man wrote it. The letter A, if you noticed, was printed after the German fashion[36 - was printed after the German fashion – была написана готическим шрифтом]. But a real German invariably prints in the Latin character[37 - in the Latin character – на латинский манер]. So we may say that a clumsy imitator wrote that. I’ll tell you more. Both men came in the same cab, and they walked down the pathway together. When they got inside they walked up and down the room. I could read all that in the dust. Then the tragedy occurred.” Our cab was going through a long succession of dingy streets and dreary by-ways. In the dingiest and dreariest of them our driver suddenly stopped. “That’s Audley Court in there,” he said. “You’ll find me here when you come back.” We came to Number 46, and saw a small slip of brass on which the name Rance was engraved. The constable appeared. “I made my report at the office,” he said. Holmes took a half-sovereign from his pocket. “We want to hear it all from your own lips,” he said. “I shall be most happy to tell you anything I can,” the constable answered. “How did it occur?” Rance sat down on the sofa, and knitted his brows. “I’ll tell it from the beginning,” he said. “My time is from ten at night to six in the morning. At one o’clock it began to rain, and I met Harry Murcher and we stood together and talked a little. After that – maybe about two or a little after – I decided to take a look round. The road was dirty and lonely. I met nobody all the way down, though a cab or two went past me. Suddenly I saw a light in the window of that house. When I came to the door…” “You stopped, and then walked back to the garden gate,” my companion interrupted. “Why did you do that?” Rance stared at Sherlock Holmes with the utmost amazement. “Yes, that’s true, sir,” he said; “but how do you know it? When I got up to the door it was so still and so lonesome, that I decided to take somebody with me, maybe Murcher. And I walked back. But I saw no one.” “There was no one in the street?” “Not a soul, sir. Then I went back and opened the door. All was quiet inside, so I went into the room where the light was burning. There was a candle on the mantelpiece – a red wax one – and I saw…” “Yes, I know all that you saw. You walked round the room several times, and you knelt down by the body, and then you walked through and opened the kitchen door, and then…” John Rance sprang to his feet with a frightened face. “Where were you, sir, that time? You saw all that!” he cried. “It seems to me that you know too much.” Holmes laughed and threw his card across the table to the constable. “Don’t arrest me for the murder,” he said. “I am one of the hounds; Mr. Gregson or Mr. Lestrade can say that as well. Go on, though. What did you do next?” “I went back to the gate and sounded my whistle. Murcher and two more arrived.” “Was the street empty then?” “Only a drunker. I saw many drunkers in my life,” he said, “but not like that one. He was at the gate when I came out, he was leaning up against the railings, and singing a song. He couldn’t stand at all.” “What sort of a man was he?” asked Sherlock Holmes. “His face – his dress – didn’t you notice them?” “He was a long chap, with a red face, the lower part muffled round[38 - the lower part muffled round – с замотанным подбородком]…” “What became of him?” cried Holmes. “I think he found his way home,” the policeman said. “How was he dressed?” “A brown overcoat.” “Had he a whip in his hand?” “A whip – no.” “Did you see or hear a cab?” asked Holmes. “No.” “There’s a half-sovereign for you,” my companion said. “I am afraid, Rance, that you will never became a sergeant. That man is the man who holds the clue of this mystery, and whom we are seeking. Come along, Doctor.” “The fool,” Holmes said, bitterly, as we drove back to our lodgings. “Holmes, it is true that the description of this man tallies with your idea of the second person in this mystery. But why did the criminal come back to the house again?” “The ring, the ring. We will use that ring, Doctor, to catch him. I must thank you for this case. I was lazy enough to go, but you forced me! A study in scarlet, eh? Let’s use a little art jargon. There’s the scarlet thread of murder through the colourless skein of life, and our duty is to unravel it, and isolate it.” Chapter V Our Advertisement Brings a Visitor I lay down upon the sofa and tried to sleep. But every time that I closed my eyes I saw before me the distorted baboon-like countenance of the murdered man. Was that man poisoned? Holmes sniffed his lips, and probably detected something. And if not poison, what caused the man’s death? There was neither wound nor marks of strangulation. But, on the other hand, whose blood was there upon the floor? We saw no signs of a struggle, the victim did not have any weapon. My friend’s quiet self-confident manner convinced me that he had a theory which explained all the facts. Holmes came very late. Dinner was on the table before he appeared. “What’s the matter?” he answered. “Does this Brixton Road affair trouble you?” “To tell the truth, it does,” I said. “I can understand. There is a mystery about this which stimulates the imagination. Did you see the evening paper?” “No.” “It tells about the affair. And it does not mention the woman’s wedding ring. That’s good.” “Why?” “Look at this advertisement,” he answered. “I sent it to every paper in the morning immediately after the affair.” He gave me the newspaper. “In Brixton Road, this morning,” it ran, “a plain gold wedding ring, found in the roadway between the ‘White Hart’ Tavern and Holland Grove. Apply Dr. Watson, 221B, Baker Street, between eight and nine this evening.” “Excuse me. I used your name,” he said. “That is all right,” I answered. “But I have no ring.” “Oh yes, you have,” said he. And he gave me one. “This will do very well[39 - This will do very well. – Это подойдёт.].” “And who will answer this advertisement?” “The man in the brown coat – our florid friend with the square toes. If he does not come himself he will send an accomplice.” “Isn’t that dangerous for him?” “Not at all. I think that this man will rather risk anything than lose the ring. He dropped it when he stooped over Drebber’s body. Then he left the house. He discovered his loss and hurried back, but found the police because the candle was burning. He pretended to be drunk in order to allay the suspicions. Now put yourself in that man’s place. He thinks that he lost the ring in the road. What will he do, then? He will eagerly read the evening papers. And he will read this advertisement. He will be overjoyed. Why fear? He will come. You will see him within an hour.” “And then?” I asked. “Oh, I’ll talk to him. Have you any arms?” “I have my old revolver and a few cartridges.” “Clean it and load it. We must be ready for anything.” I went to my bedroom and followed his advice. When I returned with the pistol, Holmes was playing violin. “I have an answer to my American telegram,” he said, as I entered. “And?” I asked eagerly. “Put your pistol in your pocket,” he remarked. “When the fellow comes speak to him in an ordinary way. Leave the rest to me. Don’t frighten him.” “It is eight o’clock now,” I said. “Yes. He will probably be here in a few minutes. Open the door slightly. Now put the key on the inside[40 - put the key on the inside – вставьте ключ изнутри]. Thank you. Here comes our man, I think.” As he spoke there was a sharp ring at the bell. Sherlock Holmes rose softly and moved his chair in the direction of the door. “Does Dr. Watson live here?” asked a clear but rather harsh voice. We could not hear the servant’s reply, but the door closed, and some one began to ascend the stairs. There was a feeble tap at the door. “Come in,” I cried. Instead of the man whom we expected, a very old and wrinkled woman hobbled into the apartment. She was blinking at us with her bleared eyes and fumbling in her pocket with nervous, shaky fingers. The old crone drew out an evening paper, and pointed at our advertisement. “A gold wedding ring in the Brixton Road, gentlemen,” she said; “It belongs to my daughter Sally. She went to the circus yesterday and lost it.” “Is that her ring?” I asked. “Yes!” cried the old woman; “Sally will be very glad. That’s the ring.” “And what is your address?” I inquired. “13, Duncan Street, Houndsditch. A long way from here.” “The Brixton Road does not lie between any circus and Houndsditch,” said Sherlock Holmes sharply. The old woman looked keenly at him. “The gentleman asked me for my address,” she said. “Sally lives in lodgings at 3, Mayfield Place, Peckham.” “And your name is…?” “My name is Sawyer – hers is Dennis. Tom Dennis married her, a smart lad…” “Here is your ring, Mrs. Sawyer,” I interrupted; “it clearly belongs to your daughter, and I am glad to restore it to the rightful owner.” With many words of gratitude the old crone took the ring and went down the stairs. Sherlock Holmes sprang to his feet and rushed into his room. He returned in a few seconds. “I’ll follow her,” he said, hurriedly; “she must be an accomplice, and will lead me to him. Wait here.” And Holmes descended the stair. It was nine when he left. Ten o’clock passed, eleven, he did not come back. It was about twelve when I heard the sharp sound of his key. When he entered, he laughed. “So what?” I asked. “That woman went a little when she began to limp. Then she hailed a cab. I was close to her so I heard the address, she cried loud enough, ‘Drive to 13, Duncan Street, Houndsditch.’ When she was inside, I perched myself behind. Well, we reached the street. I hopped off before we came to the door. The driver jumped down. He opened the door and stood expectantly. Nobody came out. There was no sign or trace of his passenger. At Number 13 a respectable paperhanger lives, he never heard about Sawyer or Dennis.” “You want to say,” I cried, in amazement, “that that feeble old woman was able to get out of the cab while it was in motion?” “Old woman!” said Sherlock Holmes, sharply. “We were the old women ourselves. It was a young man, an incomparable actor. It shows that the criminal has friends who are ready to risk something for him.” Chapter VI Tobias Gregson Shows What He Can Do The papers next day were full of the “Brixton Mystery,” as they termed it. There was some information in them which was new to me. The Daily Telegraph mentioned the German name of the victim, the absence of all other motive, and the sinister inscription on the wall; all that pointed to political refugees and revolutionists. The Standard said that the victim was an American gentleman who was staying in Camberwell. He has his private secretary, Mr. Joseph Stangerson. They left their landlady upon Tuesday, the 4th., and departed to Euston Station to catch the Liverpool express. Then Mr. Drebber’s body was discovered in an empty house in the Brixton Road, many miles from Euston. How he came there, or how he met his fate, are questions. Where is Stangerson? Nobody knows. We are glad to know that Mr. Lestrade and Mr. Gregson, of Scotland Yard, are both engaged upon the case, and they will soon throw light upon the matter. The Daily News said that it was a political murder. Sherlock Holmes and I read these articles at breakfast. “What is this?” I cried, for at this moment there came the pattering of many steps in the hall and on the stairs. “It’s the Baker Street detective police,” said my companion, gravely. As he spoke there rushed into the room half a dozen of dirty street boys. “Hush!” cried Holmes, in a sharp tone. “In future you will send Wiggins alone to report. Any news, Wiggins?” “No, sir,” said one of the youths. “I knew that. Here are your wages.” He handed each of them a shilling. “Now go away and come back with a better report next time.” They scampered away downstairs like rats. “One of those little beggars is better than a dozen of the policemen,” Holmes remarked. “These youngsters go everywhere and hear everything.” “Are you employing them for this Brixton case?” I asked. “Yes. It is merely a matter of time. Oh! Here is Gregson coming down the road. He wants to visit us, I know. Yes, he is stopping. There he is!” There was a violent peal at the bell, and in a few seconds the fair-haired detective came up the stairs. “My dear fellow,” he cried, “congratulate me! I solved the problem.” “Do you mean that you know the criminal?” asked Holmes. “Sir, we have the man under lock and key!” “And his name is?” “Arthur Charpentier, sub-lieutenant in Her Majesty’s navy[41 - Arthur Charpentier, sub-lieutenant in Her Majesty’s navy – Артур Шарпентье, младший лейтенант флота Её Величества],” cried Gregson, pompously. Sherlock Holmes smiled. “Take a seat,” he said. “And please tell us everything.” The detective seated himself in the arm-chair. Then suddenly he slapped his thigh. “The fun of it is,” he cried, “that that fool Lestrade, who thinks himself so smart, went the wrong way. He suspects the secretary Stangerson, who has nothing with the crime.” Gregson laughed. “And how did you get your clue?” I asked. “Ah, I’ll tell you all about it. Of course, Doctor Watson, this is strictly between ourselves. The first difficulty was to finding the information about the victim’s American life. Do you remember the hat beside the dead man?” “Yes,” said Holmes; “by John Underwood and Sons, 129, Camberwell Road.” “I had no idea that you noticed that,” said Gregson. “Well, I went to Underwood, and asked him about the customer of that hat. He looked over his books, and found him. He sent the hat to a Mr. Drebber, residing at Charpentier’s Boarding Establishment, Torquay Terrace[42 - Charpentier’s Boarding Establishment, Torquay Terrace – пансион Шарпантье на Торки-Террас]. Thus I got at his address.” “Smart – very smart!” murmured Sherlock Holmes. “Then I met Madame Charpentier,” continued the detective. “I found her very pale and distressed. Her daughter was in the room, too. Her lips trembled as I spoke to her. That didn’t escape my notice. I began to smell a rat. You know the feeling, Mr. Sherlock Holmes – a kind of thrill in your nerves. ‘Do you know about the mysterious death of your boarder Mr. Enoch J. Drebber, of Cleveland?’ I asked. The mother nodded. The daughter burst into tears[43 - burst into tears – расплакалась]. ‘At what o’clock did Mr. Drebber leave your house for the train?’ I asked. ‘At eight o’clock,’ she said. ‘His secretary, Mr. Stangerson, said that there were two trains – one at 9.15 and one at 11. He wanted to catch the first. ‘And did you see him after that?’ A terrible change came over the woman’s face as I asked the question. ‘No,’ she said in a husky unnatural tone. There was silence for a moment, and then the daughter spoke in a calm voice. ‘Please, don’t lie, mother,’ she said. ‘Let us be frank with this gentleman. We saw Mr. Drebber again.’ ‘Oh!’ cried Madame Charpentier. ‘You murdered your brother!’ ‘Please tell me all about it now,’ I said. ‘I will tell you all, sir!’ cried her mother, ‘Alice, leave us together. Now, sir,’ she continued, ‘I have no alternative. Mr. Drebber stayed with us nearly three weeks. He and his secretary, Mr. Stangerson, were travelling on the Continent. I noticed a “Copenhagen” label upon each of their trunks. Stangerson was a quiet reserved man, but his employer, I am sorry to say, was coarse and brutish. He drank a lot, and, indeed, after twelve o’clock he was never sober. His manners towards the maid-servants were disgustingly free and familiar. Worst of all, he assumed the same attitude towards my daughter, Alice. Once he seized her in his arms and embraced her, his own secretary reproached him for his unmanly conduct.’ ‘But why did you stand all this?’ I asked. Mrs. Charpentier blushed. ‘Money, sir,’ she said. ‘They were paying a pound a day each – fourteen pounds a week. I am a widow, and my boy in the Navy cost me much. But finally I gave Mr. Drebber’s notice to leave.’ ‘Well?’ ‘So he drove away. I did not tell my son anything of all this, for his temper is violent. When I closed the door behind them I felt happy. Alas, in less than an hour there was a ring at the bell. Mr. Drebber returned. He was much excited and drunk. He came way into the room, where I was sitting with my daughter. He missed his train. He then turned to Alice, and offered her to go with him. “You are big enough,” he said, “and there is no law to stop you. I have money enough and to spare. Come with me! You will live like a princess.” Poor Alice was so frightened that she shrunk away from him, but he caught her by the wrist. I screamed, and at that moment my son Arthur came into the room. What happened then I do not know. I was too terrified to raise my head. When I looked up I saw Arthur in the doorway. He was laughing, with a stick in his hand. “I don’t think that fellow will trouble us again,” he said. “I will go and see what he is doing at the moment.” With those words he took his hat and went out. The next morning we heard of Mr. Drebber’s mysterious death.’ This statement came from Mrs. Charpentier’s lips with many gasps and pauses.” “It’s very interesting,” said Sherlock Holmes, with a yawn. “What happened next?” “When Mrs. Charpentier paused,” the detective continued, “I asked her at what hour her son returned. ‘I do not know,’ she answered. He has a key.’ ‘When did you go to bed?’ ‘About eleven.’ ‘So your son was away at least two hours?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘Possibly four or five?’ ‘Yes.’ ‘What was he doing during that time?’ ‘I do not know,’ she answered. Of course after that I found out where Lieutenant Charpentier was, took two officers with me, and arrested him. When I touched him on the shoulder and offered him to come quietly with us, he said, ‘I suppose you are arresting me for the death of that scoundrel Drebber,’ he said. We said nothing to him about it, so this is very suspicious.” “Very,” said Holmes. “He still carried the heavy stick. It was a stout oak cudgel.” “What is your theory, then?” “Well, my theory is that he followed Drebber as far as the Brixton Road. There they had a fight, in the course of which Drebber received a blow from the stick, in the pit of the stomach, perhaps, which killed him without any mark. Then Charpentier dragged the body of his victim into the empty house. As to the candle, and the blood, and the writing on the wall, and the ring, they are just tricks to deceive the police.” “Well done, Gregson!” said Holmes. “Yes,” the detective answered proudly. “The young man says that Drebber perceived him, and took a cab in order to get away from him. On his way home he met an old shipmate[44 - old shipmate – старый товарищ по флоту], and took a long walk with him. I asked him where this old shipmate lived, but he was unable to give any satisfactory reply. But Lestrade! Just think of him! He knows nothing at all. Oh, here’s Lestrade himself!” It was indeed Lestrade, who had ascended the stairs while we were talking, and who now entered the room. His face was disturbed and troubled, while his clothes were disarranged and untidy. He stood in the centre of the room. He was fumbling nervously with his hat. “This is a most extraordinary case,” he said at last, “a most incomprehensible affair.” “You think so, Mr. Lestrade!” cried Gregson, triumphantly. “Did you find the Secretary, Mr. Joseph Stangerson?” “The Secretary, Mr. Joseph Stangerson,” said Lestrade gravely, “was murdered at Halliday’s Private Hotel about six o’clock this morning.” Chapter VII Light in the Darkness This news was unexpected. Gregson sprang out of his chair. I stared in silence at Sherlock Holmes, whose lips were compressed. “Stangerson too!” he muttered. Lestrade took a chair. “Are you sure of this?” stammered Gregson. “I was in his room,” said Lestrade. “I was the first to discover that.” “Please, Mr. Lestrade, let us know what you saw,” Holmes observed. “You see,” Lestrade answered, “I thought that Stangerson was concerned in the death of Drebber. I was wrong, it’s true. Anyway, I wanted to find the Secretary. They were together at Euston Station about half-past eight on the evening. At two in the morning Drebber was found in the Brixton Road. The question is: what did Stangerson do between 8.30 and the time of the crime, and what did he do afterwards. I telegraphed to Liverpool. I gave a description of the man, and asked them to watch upon the American boats. I then called upon all the hotels in the vicinity of Euston. You see, if Drebber and his companion become separated, Stangerson stayed somewhere in the vicinity for the night, and then went to the station again next morning.” “They agreed on some meeting-place beforehand,” remarked Holmes. “Yes, they did. I spent the whole of yesterday, I was looking for Stangerson. No luck. This morning I began very early, and at eight o’clock I reached Halliday’s Private Hotel, in Little George Street. I asked if Mr. Stangerson was living there, and they answered me ‘yes’. ‘No doubt you are the gentleman whom he was expecting,’ they said. ‘Where is he now?’ I asked. ‘He is upstairs in bed.’ ‘I will go up and see him at once,’ I said. His room was on the second floor. From under the door there curled a little red ribbon of blood, which formed a little pool. The door was locked on the inside[45 - the door was locked on the inside – дверь была заперта изнутри], but we put our shoulders to it, and entered. The window of the room was open, and beside the window lay the body of a man in his nightdress. He was dead, his limbs were rigid and cold. When we turned him over, the men from the hotel recognized him at once. It was the gentleman who engaged the room under the name of Joseph Stangerson. The cause of death was a deep stab in the left side. And now comes the strangest part of the affair. What was above the murdered man?” “The word RACHE, written in letters of blood,” said Holmes. “That was it!” said Lestrade. “A milk boy saw the murder,” continued Lestrade. “He was going to the dairy. He walked down the lane which leads from the mews at the back of the hotel. He noticed that a ladder was raised against one of the windows of the second floor, which was wide open. And he saw a man who was descending the ladder. The boy thought it was a carpenter. The man was tall, had a reddish face, and was dressed in a long, brownish coat. He stayed in the room some little time after the murder, for we found blood-stained water in the basin. We also found marks on the sheets where he wiped his knife.” I glanced at Holmes. “Did you find anything in the room which gave a clue to the murderer?” he asked. “Nothing. Stangerson had Drebber’s purse in his pocket, but it was usual, as he paid. There was eighty pounds in it. So robbery is not the motives of these extraordinary crimes. There were no papers in the murdered man’s pocket, except a single telegram, dated from Cleveland about a month ago: ‘J. H. is in Europe’.” “And there was nothing else?” Holmes asked. “Nothing of any importance. The novel, which the man read, was lying upon the bed, and his pipe was on a chair beside him. There was a glass of water on the table, and on the window-sill a small chip ointment box containing a couple of pills.” Sherlock Holmes sprang from his chair with an exclamation of delight. “The last link!” he cried, exultantly. The two detectives stared at him in amazement. “Now I know everything,” my companion said, confidently, “What about those pills?” “I have them,” said Lestrade. He showed us a small white box; “I took them and the purse and the telegram.” “Give them here,” said Holmes. “Now, Doctor,” he turned to me, “are those ordinary pills?” They certainly were not. They were of a pearly grey colour, small, round, and almost transparent. “I think that they are soluble in water,” I remarked. “Precisely so,” answered Holmes. “Now please go down and fetch that poor little terrier which the landlady wanted you to put out of its pain[46 - wanted you to put out of its pain – просила вас усыпить его, чтобы он больше не мучился]yesterday.” I went downstairs and carried the dog upstairs in my arms. It was not far from its end. I placed the terrier upon a cushion on the rug. “I will now cut one of these pills in two,” said Holmes. “One half we return into the box. The other half I will place in this glass, in which is a teaspoonful of water. You perceive that our friend, the Doctor, is right, and that it readily dissolves.” “This may be very interesting,” said Lestrade, “I cannot see, however, how it is connected with the death of Mr. Joseph Stangerson.” “Patience, my friend, patience! I shall now add a little milk and give this mixture to the dog.” Конец ознакомительного фрагмента. Текст предоставлен ООО «ЛитРес». Прочитайте эту книгу целиком, купив полную легальную версию (https://www.litres.ru/pages/biblio_book/?art=63679256&lfrom=334617187) на ЛитРес. Безопасно оплатить книгу можно банковской картой Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, со счета мобильного телефона, с платежного терминала, в салоне МТС или Связной, через PayPal, WebMoney, Яндекс.Деньги, QIWI Кошелек, бонусными картами или другим удобным Вам способом. notes Примечания 1 Assistant Surgeon – ассистент хирурга 2 the Berkshires – Беркширский полк 3 I was struck on the shoulder – я был ранен в плечо 4 which is precipitated by hemoglobin – который осаждается гемоглобином 5 on business – по делу 6 bull pup – щенок бульдога 7 dissecting-rooms – анатомический театр 8 rat-faced – с крысиной физиономией 9 railway porter – вокзальный носильщик 10 logician – человек, способный логически мыслить 11 as for the article – что касается статьи 12 bread and cheese – кусок хлеба с маслом 13 Edgar Allen Poe’s Dupin – Дюпен из романов Эдгара Алана По 14 Gaboriau’s works – романы Габорио (о детективе Лекоке) 15 retired sergeant of Marines – отставной флотский сержант 16 Royal Marine Light Infantry – королевская морская пехота 17 military carriage – военная выправка 18 pocket all the credit – прикарманить себе всю славу 19 flaxen-haired – с льняными волосами 20 frock coat – сюртук 21 top hat – цилиндр 22 thrown abroad – раскинуты 23 legs were interlocked – ноги были скрючены 24 prognathous jaw – выступающая вперёд челюсть 25 ape-like – обезьяноподобный 26 by Barraud – фирмы Барро 27 Boccaccio’s ‘Decameron’ – «Декамерон» Бокаччо 28 with name of Joseph Stangerson upon the fly-leaf – с именем Джозеф Стэнджерсон на форзаце 29 American Exchange, Strand – to be left till called for – Стрэнд, Американская биржа, до востребования 30 Guion Steamship Company – пароходная компания «Гийон» 31 tape measure – рулетка 32 magnifying glass – увеличительное стекло 33 in the prime of life – в расцвете лет 34 square-toed boots – ботинки с квадратными носками 35 with three old shoes and one new one on his off fore leg – с тремя старыми и одной новой подковой на правом переднем копыте 36 was printed after the German fashion – была написана готическим шрифтом 37 in the Latin character – на латинский манер 38 the lower part muffled round – с замотанным подбородком 39 This will do very well. – Это подойдёт. 40 put the key on the inside – вставьте ключ изнутри 41 Arthur Charpentier, sub-lieutenant in Her Majesty’s navy – Артур Шарпентье, младший лейтенант флота Её Величества 42 Charpentier’s Boarding Establishment, Torquay Terrace – пансион Шарпантье на Торки-Террас 43 burst into tears – расплакалась 44 old shipmate – старый товарищ по флоту 45 the door was locked on the inside – дверь была заперта изнутри 46 wanted you to put out of its pain – просила вас усыпить его, чтобы он больше не мучился
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