Сетевая библиотекаСетевая библиотека

Зло под солнцем / Evil Under the Sun

Зло под солнцем / Evil Under the Sun
Зло под солнцем / Evil Under the Sun Агата Кристи Билингва Bestseller В романе «Зло под солнцем» Эркюлю Пуаро предстоит побывать на респектабельном курорте. Однако покой великому сыщику только снится: даже на отдыхе ему придется заняться привычным делом – расследовать убийство. На первый взгляд картина ясна – виной всему любовный треугольник. Но треугольник может оказаться и четырех- и пятиугольником, а вполне вероятно, и куда более сложной геометрической фигурой. Агата Кристи / Agatha Christie Зло под солнцем / Evil Under the Sun Agatha Christie EVIL UNDER THE SUN Copyright © 1941 Agatha Christie Limited. AGATHA CHRISTIE and POIROT are registered trademarks of Agatha Christie Limited in the UK and elsewhere. © Саксин С.М., перевод на русский язык, 2020 © Издание на русском языке. ООО «Издательство «Эксмо», 2020 Chapter 1 When Captain Roger Angmering built himself a house in the year 1782 on the island off Leathercombe Bay, it was thought the height of eccentricity on his part. A man of good family such as he was should have had a decorous mansion set in wide meadows with, perhaps, a running stream and good pasture. But Captain Roger Angmering had only one great love, the sea. So he built his house a sturdy house too, as it needed to be, on the little windswept gull-haunted promontory cut off from land at each high tide. He did not marry, the sea was his first and last spouse, and at his death the house and island went to a distant cousin. That cousin and his descendants thought little of the bequest. Their own acres dwindled, and their heirs grew steadily poorer. In 1922 when the great cult of the Seaside for Holidays was finally established and the coast of Devon and Cornwall was no longer thought too hot in the summer, Arthur Angmering found his vast inconvenient late Georgian house unsaleable, but he got a good price for the odd bit of property acquired by the seafaring Captain Roger. The sturdy house was added to and embellished. A concrete causeway was laid down from the mainland to the island. “Walks” and “Nooks” were cut and devised all round the island. There were two tennis courts, sunterraces leading down to a little bay embellished with rafts and divingboards. The Jolly Roger Hotel, Smugglers’ Island, Leathercombe Bay came triumphantly into being. And from June till September (with a short season at Easter) the Jolly Roger Hotel was usually packed to the attics. It was enlarged and improved in 1934 by the addition of a cocktail bar, a bigger dining-room and some extra bathrooms. The prices went up. People said: “Ever been to Leathercombe Bay? Awfully jolly hotel there, on a sort of island. Very comfortable and no trippers or charabancs. Good cooking and all that. You ought to go.” And people did go. There was one very important person (in his own estimation at least) staying at the Jolly Roger. Hercule Poirot, resplendent in a white duck suit, with a Panama hat tilted over his eyes, his moustaches magnificently befurled, lay back in an improved type of deck-chair and surveyed the bathing beach. A series of terraces led down to it from the hotel. On the beach itself were floats, lilos, rubber and canvas boats, balls and rubber toys. There were a long springboard and three rafts at varying distances from the shore. Of the bathers, some were in the sea, some were lying stretched out in the sun, and some were anointing themselves carefully with oil. On the terrace immediately above, the non-bathers sat and commented on the weather, the scene in front of them, the news in the morning papers and any other subject that appealed to them. On Poirot’s left a ceaseless flow of conversation poured in gentle monotone from the lips of Mrs Gardener while at the same time her needles clacked as she knitted vigorously. Beyond her, her husband, Odell C. Gardener, lay in a hammock chair, his hat tilted forward over his nose, and occasionally uttered a brief statement when called upon to do so. On Poirot’s right, Miss Brewster, a tough athletic woman with grizzled hair and a pleasant weatherbeaten face, made gruff comments. The result sounded rather like a sheepdog whose short stentorian barks interrupted the ceaseless yapping of a Pomeranian. Mrs Gardener was saying: “And so I said to Mr Gardener, why, I said, sightseeing is all very well, and I do like to do a place thoroughly. But, after all, I said, we’ve done England pretty well and all I want now is to get some quiet spot by the seaside and just relax. That’s what I said, wasn’t it, Odell? Just relax. I feel I must relax, I said. That’s so, isn’t it, Odell?” Mr Gardener, from behind his hat, murmured: “Yes, darling.” Mrs Gardener pursued the theme. “And so, when I mentioned it to Mr Kelso, at Cook’s (He’s arranged all our itinerary for us and been most helpful in every way. I don’t really know what we’d have done without him!) Well, as I say, when I mentioned it to him, Mr Kelso said that we couldn’t do better than come here. A most picturesque spot, he said, quite out of the world, and at the same time very comfortable and most exclusive in every way. And of course Mr Gardener, he chipped in there and said what about the sanitary arrangements? Because, if you’ll believe me, Mr Poirot, a sister of Mr Gardener’s went to stay at a guesthouse once, very exclusive they said it was, and in the heart of the moors, but would you believe me, nothing but an earth closet! So naturally that made Mr Gardener suspicious of those out-of-the-world places, didn’t it, Odell?” “Why, yes, darling,” said Mr Gardener. “But Mr Kelso reassured us at once. The sanitation, he said, was absolutely the latest word, and the cooking was excellent. And I’m sure that’s so. And what I like about it is, it’s intime if you know what I mean. Being a small place we all talk to each other and everybody knows everybody. If there is a fault about the British it is that they’re inclined to be a bit stand-offish until they’ve known you a couple of years. After that nobody could be nicer. Mr Kelso said that interesting people came here and I see he was right. There’s you, Mr Poirot and Miss Darnley. Oh! I was just tickled to death when I found out who you were, wasn’t I, Odell?” “You were, darling.” “Ha!” said Miss Brewster, breaking in explosively. “What a thrill, eh, M. Poirot?” Hercule Poirot raised his hands in deprecation. But it was no more than a polite gesture. Mrs Gardener flowed smoothly on. “You see, M. Poirot, I’d heard a lot about you from Cornelia Robson. Mr Gardener and I were at Badenhof in May. And of course Cornelia told us all about that business in Egypt when Linnet Ridgeway was killed. She said you were wonderful and I’ve always been simply crazy to meet you, haven’t I, Odell?” “Yes, darling.” “And then Miss Darnley, too. I get a lot of my things at Rose Mond’s and of course she is Rose Mond, isn’t she? I think her clothes are ever so clever. Such a marvellous line. That dress I had on last night was one of hers. She’s just a lovely woman in every way, I think.” From beyond Miss Brewster, Major Barry who had been sitting with protuberant eyes glued to the bathers granted out: “Distinguished-lookin’ gal!” Mrs Gardener clacked her needles. “I’ve just got to confess one thing, M. Poirot. It gave me a kind of a turn meeting you here – not that I wasn’t just thrilled to meet you, because I was. Mr Gardener knows that. But it just came to me that you might be here well, professionally. You know what I mean? Well, I’m just terribly sensitive, as Mr Gardener will tell you, and I just couldn’t bear it if I was to be mixed up in crime of any kind. You see – ” Mr Gardener cleared his throat. He said: “You see, M. Poirot, Mrs Gardener is very sensitive.” The hands of Hercule Poirot shot into the air. “But let me assure you, Madame, that I am here simply in the same way that you are here yourselves – to enjoy myself – to spend the holiday. I do not think of crime even.” Miss Brewster said again giving her short gruff bark: “No bodies on Smugglers’ Island.” Hercule Poirot said: “Ah! but that, it is not strictly true.” He pointed downward. “Regard them there, lying out in rows. What are they? They are not men and women. There is nothing personal about them. They are just – bodies!” Major Barry said appreciatively: “Good-looking fillies, some of ‘em. Bit on the thin side, perhaps.” Poirot cried: “Yes, but what appeal is there? What mystery? I, I am old, of the old school. When I was young, one saw barely the ankle. The glimpse of a foamy petticoat, how alluring! The gentle swelling of the calf – a knee – a beribboned garter – ” “Naughty, naughty!” said Major Barry hoarsely. “Much more sensible – the things we wear nowadays,” said Miss Brewster. “Why, yes, M. Poirot,” said Mrs Gardener. “I do think, you know, that our girls and boys nowadays lead a much more natural healthy life. They just romp about together and they – well, they – ” Mrs Gardener blushed slightly for she had a nice mind – “they think nothing of it, if you know what I mean?” “I do know,” said Hercule Poirot. “It is deplorable!” “Deplorable?” squeaked Mrs Gardener. “To remove all the romance all the mystery! Today everything is standardized!” He waved a hand towards the recumbent figures. “That reminds me very much of the Morgue in Paris.” “M. Poirot!” Mrs Gardener was scandalized. “Bodies arranged on slabs like butcher’s meat!” “But M. Poirot, isn’t that too far-fetched for words?” Hercule Poirot admitted: “It may be, yes.” “All the same,” Mrs Gardener knitted with energy, “I’m inclined to agree with you on one point. These girls that lie out like that in the sun will grow hair on their legs and arms. I’ve said so to Irene – that’s my daughter, M. Poirot. Irene, I said to her, if you lie out like that in the sun, you’ll have hair all over you, hair on your arms and hair on your legs and hair on your bosom, and what will you look like then? I said to her. Didn’t I, Odell?” “Yes, darling,” said Mr Gardener. Everyone was silent, perhaps making a mental picture of Irene when the worst had happened. Mrs Gardener rolled up her knitting and said: “I wonder now – ” Mr Gardener said: “Yes, darling?” He struggled out of the hammock chair and took Mrs Gardener’s knitting and her book. He asked: “What about joining us for a drink, Miss Brewster?” “Not just now, thanks.” The Gardeners went up to the hotel. Miss Brewster said: “American husbands are wonderful!” Mrs Gardener’s place was taken by the Reverend Stephen Lane. Mr Lane was a tall vigorous clergyman of fifty odd. His face was tanned and his dark grey flannel trousers were holidayfied and disreputable. He said with enthusiasm: “Marvellous country! I’ve been from Leathercombe Bay to Harford and back over the cliffs.” “Warm work walking today,” said Major Barry who never walked. “Good exercise,” said Miss Brewster. “I haven’t been for my row yet. Nothing like rowing for your stomach muscles.” The eyes of Hercule Poirot dropped somewhat ruefully to a certain protuberance in his middle. Miss Brewster, noting the glance, said kindly: “You’d soon get that off, M. Poirot, if you took a rowing-boat out every day.” “Merci, Mademoiselle. I detest boats!” “You mean small boats?” “Boats of all sizes!” He closed his eyes and shuddered. “The movement of the sea, it is not pleasant.” “Bless the man, the sea is as calm as a mill pond today.” Poirot replied with conviction: “There is no such thing as a really calm sea. Always, always, there is motion.” “If you ask me,” said Major Barry, “seasickness is nine-tenths nerves.” “There,” said the clergyman, smiling a little, “speaks the good sailor – eh, Major?” “Only been ill once – and that was crossing the channel! Don’t think about it, that’s my motto.” “Seasickness is really a very odd thing,” mused Miss Brewster. “Why should some people be subject to it and not others? It seems so unfair. And nothing to do with one’s ordinary health. Quite sickly people are good sailors. Someone told me once it was something to do with one’s spine. Then there’s the way some people can’t stand heights. I’m not very good myself, but Mrs Redfern is far worse. The other day, on the cliff path to Harford, she turned quite giddy and simply clung to me. She told me she once got stuck halfway down that outside staircase on Milan Cathedral. She’d gone up without thinking but coming down did for her.” “She’d better not go down the ladder to Pixy Cove, then,” observed Lane. Miss Brewster made a face. “I funk that myself. It’s all right for the young. The Cowan boys and the young Mastermans, they run up and down it and enjoy it.” Lane said: “Here comes Mrs Redfern now coming up from her bathe.” Miss Brewster remarked: “M. Poirot ought to approve of her. She’s no sun bather.” Young Mrs Redfern had taken off her rubber cap and was shaking out her hair. She was an ash blonde and her skin was of that dead fairness that goes with that colouring. Her legs and arms were very white. With a hoarse chuckle, Major Barry said: “Looks a bit uncooked among the others, doesn’t she?” Wrapping herself in a long bathrobe Christine Redfern came up the beach and mounted the steps towards them. She had a fair serious face, pretty in a negative way, and small dainty hands and feet. She smiled at them and dropped down beside them, tucking her bath-wrap round her. Miss Brewster said: “You have earned M. Poirot’s good opinion. He doesn’t like the sun-tanning crowd. Says they’re like joints of butcher’s meat or words to that effect.” Christine Redfern smiled ruefully. She said: “I wish I could sunbathe! But I don’t brown. I only blister and get the most frightful freckles all over my arms.” “Better than getting hair all over them like Mrs Gardener’s Irene,” said Miss Brewster. In answer to Christine’s inquiring glance she went on: “Mrs Gardener’s been in grand form this morning. Absolutely non stop. ‘Isn’t that so, Odell?’ ‘Yes, darling.’” She paused and then said: “I wish, though, M. Poirot, that you’d played up to her a bit. Why didn’t you tell her that you were down here investigating a particularly gruesome murder, and that the murderer, an homicidal maniac, was certainly to be found among the guests of the hotel?” Hercule Poirot sighed. He said: “I very much fear she would have believed me.” Major Barry gave a wheezy chuckle. He said: “She certainly would.” Emily Brewster said: “No, I don’t believe even Mrs Gardener would have believed in a crime staged here. This isn’t the sort of place you’d get a body!” Hercule Poirot stirred a little in his chair. He protested. He said: “But why not, Mademoiselle? Why should there not be what you call a ‘body’ here on Smugglers’ Island?” Emily Brewster said: “I don’t know. I suppose some places are more unlikely than others. This isn’t the kind of spot – ” She broke off, finding it difficult to explain her meaning. “It is romantic, yes,” agreed Hercule Poirot. “It is peaceful. The sun shines. The sea is blue. But you forget, Miss Brewster, there is evil everywhere under the sun.” The clergyman stirred in his chair. He leaned forward. His intensely blue eyes lighted up. Miss Brewster shrugged her shoulders. “Oh! of course I realize that, but all the same – ” “But all the same this still seems to you an unlikely setting for crime? You forget one thing, Mademoiselle.” “Human nature, I suppose?” “That, yes. That, always. But that was not what I was going to say. I was going to point out to you that here every one is on holiday.” Emily Brewster turned a puzzled face to him. “I don’t understand.” Hercule Poirot beamed kindly at her. He made dabs in the air with an emphatic forefinger. “Let us say, you have an enemy. If you seek him out in his flat, in his office, in the street – eh bien, you must have a reason – you must account for yourself. But here at the seaside it is necessary for no one to account for himself. You are at Leathercombe Bay, why? Parbleu! it is August – one goes to the seaside in August – one is on one’s holiday. It is quite natural, you see, for you to be here and for Mr Lane to be here and for Major Barry to be here and for Mrs Redfern and her husband to be here. Because it is the custom in England to go to the seaside in August.” “Well,” admitted Miss Brewster, “that’s certainly a very ingenious idea. But what about the Gardeners? They’re American.” Poirot smiled. “Even Mrs Gardener, as she told us, feels the need to relax. Also, since she is ‘doing’ England, she must certainly spend a fortnight at the seaside – as a good tourist, if nothing else. She enjoys watching people.” Mrs Redfern murmured: “You like watching the people too, I think?” “Madame, I will confess it. I do.” She said thoughtfully: “You see – a good deal.” There was a pause. Stephen Lane cleared his throat and said with a trace of self-consciousness: “I was interested, M. Poirot, in something you said just now. You said that there was evil done everywhere under the sun. It was almost a quotation from Ecclesiastes.” He paused and then quoted himself. “Yea, also the heart of the sons of men is full of evil, and madness is in their heart while they live.” His face lit up with an almost fanatical light. “I was glad to hear you say that. Nowadays, no one believes in evil. It is considered, at most, a mere negation of good. Evil, people say, is done by those who know no better – who are undeveloped – who are to be pitied rather than blamed. But, M. Poirot, evil is real! It is a fact! I believe in Evil as I believe in Good. It exists! It is powerful! It walks the earth!” He stopped. His breath was coming fast. He wiped his forehead with a handkerchief and looked suddenly apologetic. “I’m sorry. I got carried away.” Poirot said calmly: “I understand your meaning. Up to a point I agree with you. Evil does walk the earth and can be recognized as such.” Major Barry cleared his throat. “Talking of that sort of thing, some of these fakir fellers in India – ” Major Barry had been long enough at the Jolly Roger for everyone to be on their guard against his fatal tendency to embark on long India stories. Both Miss Brewster and Mrs Redfern burst into speech. “That’s your husband swimming in now, isn’t it, Mrs Redfern? How magnificent his crawl stroke is. He’s an awfully good swimmer.” At the same moment Mrs Redfern said: “Oh, look! What a lovely little boat that is out there with the red sails. It’s Mr Blatt’s, isn’t it?” The sailing boat with the red sails was just crossing the end of the bay. Major Barry grunted: “Fanciful idea, red sails,” but the menace of the story about the fakir was avoided. Hercule Poirot looked with appreciation at the young man who had just swum to shore. Patrick Redfern was a good specimen of humanity. Lean, bronzed, with broad shoulders and narrow thighs, there was about him a kind of infectious enjoyment and gaiety – a native simplicity that endeared him to all women and most men. He stood there shaking the water from him and raising a hand in gay salutation to his wife. She waved back, calling out: “Come up here, Pat.” “I’m coming.” He went a little way along the beach to retrieve the towel he had left there. It was then that a woman came down past them from the hotel to the beach. Her arrival had all the importance of a stage entrance. Moreover, she walked as though she knew it. There was no self-consciousness apparent. It would seem that she was too used to the invariable effect her presence produced. She was tall and slender. She wore a simple backless white bathing dress and every inch of her exposed body was tanned a beautiful even shade of bronze. She was as perfect as a statue. Her hair was a rich flaming auburn curling richly and intimately into her neck. Her face had that slight hardness which is seen when thirty years have come and gone, but the whole effect of her was one of youth – of superb and triumphant vitality. There was a Chinese immobility about her face, and an upward slant of the dark blue eyes. On her head she wore a fantastic Chinese hat of jade-green cardboard. There was that about her which made very other woman on the beach seem faded and insignificant. And with equal inevitability, the eye of every male present was drawn and rivetted on her. The eyes of Hercule Poirot opened, his moustache quivered appreciatively. Major Barry sat up and his protuberant eyes bulged even further with excitement; on Poirot’s left the Reverend Stephen Lane drew in his breath with a little hiss and his figure stiffened. Major Barry said in a hoarse whisper: “Arlena Stuart (that’s who she was before she married Marshall) – I saw her in Come and Go before she left the stage. Something worth looking at, eh?” Christine Redfern said slowly and her voice was cold: “She’s handsome – yes. I think – she looks rather a beast!” Emily Brewster said abruptly: “You talked about evil just now, M. Poirot. Now to my mind that woman’s a personification of evil! She’s a bad lot through and through. I happen to know a good deal about her.” Major Barry said reminiscently: “I remember a gal out in Simla. She had red hair too. Wife of a subaltern. Did she set the place by the ears? I’ll say she did! Men went mad about her! All the women, of course, would have liked to gouge her eyes out! She upset the apple cart in more homes than one.” He chuckled reminiscently. “Husband was a nice quiet fellow. Worshipped the ground she walked on. Never saw a thing – or made out he didn’t.” Stephen Lane said in a low voice full of intense feeling: “Such women are a menace – a menace to – ” He stopped. Arlena Stuart had come to the water’s edge. Two young men, little more than boys, had sprung up and come eagerly toward her. She stood smiling at them. Her eyes slid past them to where Patrick Redfern was coming along the beach. It was, Hercule Poirot thought, like watching the needle of a compass. Patrick Redfern was deflected, his feet changed their direction. The needle, do what it will, must obey the law of magnetism and turn to the North. Patrick Redfern’s feet brought him to Arlena Stuart. She stood smiling at him. Then she moved slowly along the beach by the side of the waves. Patrick Redfern went with her. She stretched herself out by a rock. Redfern dropped to the shingle beside her. Abruptly, Christine Redfern got up and went into the hotel. There was an uncomfortable little silence after she had left. Then Emily Brewster said: “It’s rather too bad. She’s a nice little thing. They’ve only been married a year or two.” “Gal I was speaking of,” said Major Barry, “the one in Simla. She upset a couple of really happy marriages. Seemed a pity, what?” “There’s a type of woman,” said Miss Brewster, “who likes smashing up homes.” She added after a minute or two, “Patrick Redfern’s a fool!” Hercule Poirot said nothing. He was gazing down the beach, but he was not looking at Patrick Redfern and Arlena Stuart. Miss Brewster said: “Well, I’d better go and get hold of my boat.” She left them. Major Barry turned his boiled gooseberry eyes with mild curiosity on Poirot. “Well, Poirot,” he said. “What are you thinking about? You’ve not opened your mouth. What do you think of the siren? Pretty hot?” Poirot said: “C’est possible.” “Now then, you old dog. I know you Frenchmen!” Poirot said coldly: “I am not a Frenchman!” “Well, don’t tell me you haven’t got an eye for a pretty girl! What do you think of her, eh?” Hercule Poirot said: “She is not young.” “What does that matter? A woman’s as old as she looks! Her looks are all right.” Hercule Poirot nodded. He said: “Yes, she is beautiful. But it is not beauty that counts in the end. It is not beauty that makes every head (except one) turn on the beach to look at her.” “It’s it, my boy,” said the Major. “That’s what it is – it.” Then he said with sudden curiosity: “What are you looking at so steadily?” Hercule Poirot replied: “I’m looking at the exception. At the one man who did not look up when she passed.” Major Barry followed his gaze to where it rested on a man of about forty, fair-haired and sun-tanned. He had a quiet, pleasant face and was sitting on the beach smoking a pipe and reading the Times. “Oh, that!” said Major Barry. “That’s the husband, my boy. That’s Marshall.” Hercule Poirot said: “Yes, I know.” Major Barry chuckled. He himself was a bachelor. He was accustomed to think of The Husband in three lights only – as “the Obstacle,” “the Inconvenience” or “the Safeguard.” He said: “Seems a nice fellow. Quiet. Wonder if my Times has come?” He got up and went up towards the hotel. Poirot’s glance shifted slowly to the face of Stephen Lane. Stephen Lane was watching Arlena Marshall and Patrick Redfern. He turned suddenly to Poirot. There was a stern fanatical light in his eyes. He said: “That woman is evil through and through. Do you doubt it?” Poirot said slowly: “It is difficult to be sure.” Stephen Lane said: “But, man alive, don’t you feel it in the air? All round you? The presence of Evil.” Slowly, Hercule Poirot nodded his head. Глава 1 Когда в 1782 году капитан Роджер Энгмеринг построил себе дом на островке в Лезеркомбском заливе, его решение явилось верхом эксцентричности. Человеку из добропорядочного семейства полагалось иметь красивый особняк, окруженный просторной лужайкой, возможно, недалеко от живописного ручья и пастбища. Однако у капитана Роджера Энгмеринга была в жизни только одна любовь: море. Поэтому он построил свой дом – прочный, добротный, как и подобало, – на крохотной, продуваемой всеми ветрами косе, населенной одними чайками, во время прилива превращавшейся в островок. Старый морской волк так и не женился – море осталось его первой и последней избранницей, – и после его смерти дом и островок отошли к какому-то дальнему родственнику. Этому родственнику и его потомкам до нежданного наследства не было никакого дела. Их собственные владения непрерывно сокращались, и они с каждым поколением становились все беднее. Но вот в 1922 году наконец появилась мода на отдых на взморье, и климат побережья Девона и Корнуолла перестал считаться слишком жарким. Артур Энгмеринг обнаружил, что его огромный неудобный особняк георгианской эпохи никому не нужен, зато совершенно неожиданно он смог получить кругленькую сумму за недвижимость, давным-давно приобретенную его далеким предком капитаном Роджером. Добротный дом был заново отделан, к нему добавились пристройки. От большой земли к острову протянулась бетонная дамба. По всему острову были проложены «дорожки» и устроены «живописные уголки». Появились два теннисных корта, солярии, спускающиеся террасами к маленькой бухте, облагороженной мостками для купания. В результате возник прекрасный пансионат «Веселый Роджер», расположенный на острове Контрабандистов в Лезеркомбском заливе. С июня по сентябрь (плюс короткий промежуток времени на Пасху) «Веселый Роджер» был, как правило, заполнен отдыхающими до самого чердака. В 1934 году пансионат был расширен и переделан, появились коктейль-бар, более просторный обеденный зал и дополнительные номера. Цены взлетели. Люди говорили: – Вам доводилось бывать в Лезеркомбском заливе? Там просто чудный пансионат на острове. Очень уютно, и никаких туристов, автобусных экскурсий… Отличные кухня и обслуживание. Вам непременно нужно побывать там. И люди отправлялись в «Веселый Роджер». В пансионате отдыхал один очень важный – по крайней мере в своих собственных глазах – гость: Эркюль Пуаро. В элегантном парусиновом костюме и соломенной шляпе, надвинутой на глаза, с безукоризненно ухоженными усиками, он полулежал в удобном шезлонге и обозревал пляж. К морю от пансионата спускался террасами солярий. Берег был усеян надувными матрасами, кругами, лодками, байдарками, мячами и резиновыми игрушками. От плавательных мостиков в воду отходил длинный трамплин. В заливе покачивались три плота. Одни отдыхающие плескались в море, другие жарились на солнце, третьи старательно натирались маслом для загара. На самой верхней террасе солярия находились те, кто не купался. Они обсуждали погоду, открывающееся перед ними зрелище, новости из утренних газет и прочие темы, вызывающие у них интерес. Слева от Пуаро журчал нескончаемый поток слов, изливающийся из уст миссис Гарднер под аккомпанемент постукивания спиц для вязания. У нее за спиной лежал в шезлонге ее муж Оделл К. Гарднер с надвинутой на нос шляпой, время от времени изрекающий краткое замечание, но только когда к нему обращались. Сидящая справа от Пуаро мисс Брюстер, крепкая женщина атлетического телосложения с седеющими волосами и приятным загорелым лицом, временами недовольно ворчала. В результате создавалось впечатление, будто здоровенная овчарка своим отрывистым зычным лаем прерывала бесконечное тявканье шпица. – Вот я и сказала мистеру Гарднеру, – говорила миссис Гарднер, – ну да, сказала я ему, осматривать достопримечательности, конечно, здорово. Но, в конце концов, сказала я, Англию мы изъездили вдоль и поперек, и теперь я хочу отправиться в какое-нибудь тихое местечко у моря и просто отдохнуть. Вот что я ему сказала, ведь так, Оделл? Просто отдохнуть. Я чувствую, мне нужно отдохнуть, сказала я. Правда, Оделл? – Да, дорогая, – пробормотал из-под шляпы мистер Гарднер. – И вот, – продолжала развивать свою тему миссис Гарднер, – когда я сказала об этом мистеру Келсоу из агентства путешествий Кука – это он для нас все устроил; он был ну очень любезен, я даже не знаю, что бы мы делали без него! – так вот, когда я сказала об этом мистеру Келсоу, он ответил, что лучше места, чем здесь, мы нигде не найдем. Очень живописное место, сказал он, отрезанное от всего мира, и в то же время комфорт на высшем уровне. И тут, разумеется, мистер Гарднер, – он вмешался и спросил: а как обстоит дело с санитарными условиями? Видите ли, месье Пуаро, вы не поверите, но сестра мистера Гарднера однажды остановилась в одной небольшой гостинице, ее также рекомендовали как уединенную, посреди болот, но можете ли вы поверить, туалет там был на улице! Поэтому, естественно, мистер Гарднер подозрительно относится ко всем подобным «уединенным» местам, ведь так, Оделл? – Ну да, конечно, дорогая, – подтвердил мистер Гарднер. – Но мистер Келсоу сразу же нас успокоил. Вся сантехника, сказал он, по самому последнему слову, и кухня восхитительная. И я полностью с ним согласна. И что мне еще нравится, так это интимность, если вы понимаете, что я имею в виду. Место очень маленькое, мы общаемся только друг с другом, и все знают всех. Если в англичанах и есть недостаток, так это то, что они склонны вести себя чересчур чопорно с теми, с кем не знакомы по крайней мере пару лет. Потом-то милее людей не найдешь! Мистер Келсоу сказал, что сюда приезжают интересные люди, и я вижу, что он прав. Взять, к примеру, вас, месье Пуаро, или мисс Дарнли. О! Я просто безумно обрадовалась, когда узнала, кто вы такой, правда, Оделл? – Именно так, дорогая. – Ха! – резко вмешалась мисс Брюстер. – Как это замечательно, вы не находите, месье Пуаро? Тот протестующе вскинул руки, но это был не более чем вежливый жест. Миссис Гарднер продолжала как ни в чем не бывало: – Видите ли, месье Пуаро, я много слышала о вас от Корнелии Робсон, отдыхавшей в Баденхофе. Мы с мистером Гарднером были в Баденхофе в мае. И, разумеется, Корнелия подробно рассказала нам о тех событиях в Египте, когда была убита Линнет Риджуэй. По ее мнению, вы были просто великолепны, и я прямо-таки смерть как хотела с вами познакомиться, не так ли, Оделл? – Да, дорогая. – А тут еще и мисс Дарнли… У меня много вещей от «Роз монд», а она, оказывается, и есть «Роз монд», ведь так? По-моему, вся ее одежда так продумана. Такая чудесная линия! То платье, которое было на мне вчера вечером, – это ее работа. По-моему, она просто очаровательная женщина во всех отношениях. Позади мисс Брюстер послышалось ворчание майора Барри, не отрывавшего своих выпученных глаз от купающихся. – Весьма впечатляющая девочка! Миссис Гарднер застучала спицами. – Месье Пуаро, я должна кое в чем вам сознаться. Встретив вас здесь, я испытала самый настоящий шок – только не подумайте, будто я не была в восторге от знакомства с вами, потому что я на седьмом небе от счастья. Мистер Гарднер это подтвердит. Но просто я подумала, что вас сюда привел… ну, профессиональный интерес. Надеюсь, вы понимаете, что я хочу сказать? На самом деле я ужасно впечатлительная, как вам подтвердит мистер Гарднер, и просто не пережила бы, если б оказалась причастна к какому-либо преступлению. Видите ли… – Видите ли, месье Пуаро, – кашлянув, сказал мистер Гарднер, – миссис Гарднер очень впечатлительная. Руки Эркюля Пуаро взметнулись в воздух. – Но позвольте заверить вас в том, мадам, что я здесь с той же целью, что и вы, – я провожу отпуск, наслаждаюсь жизнью. Я даже не думаю о преступлениях! – Никаких тел на острове Контрабандистов! – снова отрывисто пролаяла мисс Брюстер. – О, но это не совсем так, – возразил Пуаро, указывая вниз. – Взгляните вон туда, на ряды загорающих. Что они собой представляют? Это не мужчины и женщины. Это просто тела. – Среди них есть весьма привлекательные лапочки, – тоном знатока произнес майор Барри. – Вот только, пожалуй, чересчур худые. – Да, но какое в них притяжение? – воскликнул Пуаро. – Какая тайна? Я человек пожилой, старой закалки. Когда я был молодым, можно было с трудом увидеть щиколотку. Мельком взглянуть на кружевную нижнюю юбку – какой соблазн! Плавный изгиб икры… колено… подвязки с лентами… – Распущенность! – довольно резко промолвил майор Барри. – Распущенность! – Гораздо практичнее то, что мы носим сейчас, – заметила мисс Брюстер. – Ну да, месье Пуаро, – сказала миссис Гарднер. – Знаете, я действительно считаю, что в настоящее время наши девушки и юноши ведут более естественный, здоровый образ жизни. Они просто веселятся вместе и… ну, они… – Она слегка покраснела, поскольку у нее была чистая душа. – Они совсем не думают об этом, если вы понимаете, что я имею в виду. – Я вас понимаю, – сказал Эркюль Пуаро. – Это прискорбно! – Прискорбно? – пискнула миссис Гарднер. – Исключить всю романтику – всю тайну! Сегодня все стандартизовано! – Маленький бельгиец указал на распростертые ниже фигуры. – Это очень напоминает мне парижский морг. – Месье Пуаро! – негодующе воскликнула миссис Гарднер. – Тела – разложенные на досках – совсем как туши в мясной лавке! – Месье Пуаро, вам это сравнение не кажется слишком натянутым? – Да, возможно, – согласился тот. – И все же, – снова заговорила миссис Гарднер, усиленно работая спицами, – я склонна согласиться с вами в одном. У этих девушек, лежащих вот так на солнце, вырастут волосы на ногах и руках. Я так и сказала Ирен – это моя дочь, месье Пуаро. «Ирен, – сказала я ей, – если ты будешь вот так лежать на солнце, у тебя повсюду вырастут волосы – волосы на руках, волосы на ногах, волосы на животе, и как ты тогда будешь выглядеть?» Я так ей и сказала, правда, Оделл? – Да, дорогая, – подтвердил мистер Гарднер. Все молчали, вероятно, мысленно представляя себе бедную Ирен, с которой может случиться такое несчастье. Миссис Гарднер свернула свое вязание. – Как насчет того… – Да, дорогая? – сказал мистер Гарднер и, с трудом поднявшись с шезлонга, забрал у миссис Гарднер вязание и книгу. – Мисс Брюстер, не желаете что-нибудь выпить вместе с нами? – Нет, не сейчас, благодарю вас. Чета Гарднер направилась в пансионат. – Американские мужья просто восхитительны! – сказала мисс Брюстер. Место миссис Гарднер занял преподобный Стивен Лейн. Высокому энергичному священнику было лет пятьдесят с небольшим. Его загорелое лицо и темно-серые свободные фланелевые брюки нисколько не соответствовали его сану. – Замечательное место! – воодушевленно произнес он. – Я сходил из Лезеркомб-Бэй в Харфорд и обратно по скалам. – Сегодня для пеших прогулок чересчур жарко, – заметил майор Барри, никогда не ходивший гулять. – Отличное упражнение, – сказала мисс Брюстер. – Я сегодня еще не занималась греблей. Ничто не сравнится с греблей для мышц живота. Эркюль Пуаро печально посмотрел на заметную выпуклость у себя на талии. Перехватив его взгляд, мисс Брюстер благожелательно сказала: – Вы быстро от этого избавитесь, месье Пуаро, если начнете каждый день грести веслами. – Merci, Mademoiselle. Я ненавижу лодки! – Вы имеете в виду маленькие лодки? – Лодки, суда, корабли всех размеров! – Закрыв глаза, Пуаро поежился. – Движение моря, оно неприятное. – Помилуй бог, сегодня море спокойное, словно заводь. – Такой вещи, как абсолютно спокойное море, не бывает, – убежденно заявил маленький бельгиец. – Всегда, всегда есть какое-то движение! – Если хотите знать мое мнение, – вмешался майор Барри, – морская болезнь – это на девять десятых нервы. – Вот слова настоящего моряка, – усмехнулся священник. – Да, майор? – Морская болезнь мучила меня всего один раз – и это было во время переправы через Ла-Манш. Не надо об этом думать – вот мой девиз. – На самом деле морская болезнь – это очень странная штука, – задумчиво промолвила мисс Брюстер. – Почему одни люди ей подвержены, а другие – нет? По-моему, это так несправедливо… Причем морская болезнь никак не связана с состоянием здоровья. Весьма болезненные люди хорошо переносят качку. Кто-то мне говорил, что это как-то связано со спиной. Опять же, некоторые боятся высоты. Я сама не могу этим похвастаться, но у миссис Редферн дело обстоит гораздо хуже. На днях на тропе, ведущей по скалам в Харфорд, у нее вдруг закружилась голова, и она прямо-таки вцепилась в меня. Она рассказала мне, что однажды застряла на полдороге, спускаясь по наружной лестнице с миланского кафедрального собора. Наверх она поднялась, ни о чем не думая, а вот спуск ее доконал. – В таком случае ей лучше не спускаться по ступеням в бухту Эльфов, – заметил Лейн. Мисс Брюстер скорчила гримасу. – Мне самой там жутко страшно. А вот молодежи хоть бы хны. Мальчишки Коуэны и молодые Мастерманы, так те с восторгом носятся сломя голову вверх и вниз. – Сюда идет миссис Редферн, – сказал Лейн. – Возвращается после купания. – Месье Пуаро, вам следует ею восхищаться, – заметила мисс Брюстер. – Она не любит загорать. Сняв резиновую шапочку, молодая миссис Редферн тряхнула волосами. Пепельная блондинка, она обладала удивительно белой кожей. – На фоне остальных она выглядит какой-то недожаренной, вы не находите? – усмехнулся майор Барри. Закутавшись в длинный халат, Кристина Редферн поднялась по ступеням вверх. У нее было открытое серьезное лицо, по-своему привлекательное, и маленькие изящные руки и ноги. Улыбнувшись, она подсела к отдыхающим, кутаясь в халат. – Вы заслужили одобрение месье Пуаро, – сказала мисс Брюстер. – Он не любит тех, кто жарится на солнце. Говорит, что они похожи на мясные туши – или что-то в таком духе. Кристина Редферн печально улыбнулась. – Мне очень хотелось бы загорать! – сказала она. – Но моя кожа не темнеет. Она только начинает шелушиться, а руки покрываются ужасными веснушками. – Уж лучше так, чем если б они покрылись волосами, как у Ирен, дочери миссис Гарднер, – заметила мисс Брюстер. Отвечая на вопросительный взгляд Кристины, она продолжала: – Сегодня утром миссис Гарднер была в великолепной форме. Не умолкала ни на минуту. «Не так ли, Оделл?» «Да, дорогая»… – Помолчав, она сказала: – И все же я жалею, месье Пуаро, что вы ее не разыграли. А надо было бы. Ну почему вы не сказали ей, что ведете здесь расследование одного страшного убийства и убийца, кровожадный маньяк, находится среди отдыхающих? – Я очень боюсь, что она поверила бы мне, – вздохнул детектив. Майор Барри хрипло усмехнулся. – Непременно поверила бы. – Нет, не думаю, что даже миссис Гарднер поверила бы в то, что здесь готовится преступление, – сказала мисс Брюстер. – Это не то место, где может произойти убийство! Пуаро заерзал в кресле. – Но почему же, мадемуазель? – возразил он. – Почему здесь, на острове Контрабандистов, не может произойти убийство? – Не знаю, – ответила Эмили Брюстер. – Наверное, одни места подходят для этого меньше других. Здесь не та обстановка… Она умолкла, не в силах подобрать подходящие слова. – Да, здесь романтично, – согласился Пуаро. – Полная умиротворенность. Светит солнце. Море голубое. Но вы забываете, мисс Брюстер, что повсюду под солнцем обитает зло. Встрепенувшись, священник подался вперед. Его ярко-голубые глаза вспыхнули. Мисс Брюстер пожала плечами: – О, разумеется, я это понимаю, но все же… – Но все же это место по-прежнему кажется вам не подходящим для преступления? Вы забываете одну вещь, мадемуазель. – Я так понимаю, человеческую природу? – И это тоже. Она присутствует всегда. Но я хотел сказать другое. Я собирался напомнить вам, что здесь все на отдыхе. – Не понимаю, – недоуменно посмотрела на него Эмили Брюстер. Вежливо улыбнувшись, Пуаро выразительно поднял указательный палец. – Предположим, у вас есть враг. Если вы станете искать его у него в квартире, у него на работе, на улице – eh bien, вам будет нужна причина, вы должны будете объяснить свое присутствие. Но здесь, на взморье, никому не нужно объяснять свое присутствие. Зачем вы приехали в Лезеркомбский залив? Parbleu! На дворе август – а в августе все отправляются на море, все отдыхают. Понимаете, для вас, и для мистера Лейна, и для майора Барри, и для миссис Редферн и ее супруга совершенно естественно находиться здесь. Потому что в Англии в августе принято отправляться на море. – Ну хорошо, – согласилась мисс Брюстер, – определенно, это очень оригинальная мысль. Но что насчет Гарднеров? Они ведь американцы. – Даже миссис Гарднер, как она сама нам сказала, чувствует потребность отдохнуть, – улыбнулся Пуаро. – К тому же, поскольку она сейчас «обрабатывает» Англию, ей ну просто необходимо провести пару недель на взморье – по крайней мере в качестве туриста. Она любит наблюдать за людьми. – Думаю, и вам тоже нравится наблюдать за людьми, да? – пробормотала миссис Редферн. – Мадам, признаюсь, нравится. – Вы замечаете все – абсолютно все, – задумчиво произнесла она. Какое-то время все молчали. Наконец Стивен Лейн откашлялся и смущенно произнес: – Месье Пуаро, меня заинтересовала одна ваша фраза. Вы сказали, что повсюду под солнцем обитает зло. Это почти дословная цитата из Екклесиаста. – Помолчав, он процитировал Священное Писание: «И сердце сынов человеческих исполнено зла, и безумие в сердце их, в жизни их». – Его лицо озарилось фанатичным светом. – Я рад, что вы это сказали. В наши дни никто не верит в зло. В крайнем случае оно считается лишь противоположностью добра. Зло, говорят люди, творится теми, кто не знает ничего другого, – недоразвитыми, и их нужно не винить, а жалеть. Однако на самом деле, месье Пуаро, зло существует в действительности! Оно реальное! Я верю в Зло так же, как верю в Бога. Оно существует! Оно ходит по земле! Священник остановился, учащенно дыша. Отерев лоб платком, он виновато огляделся вокруг. – Извините, я несколько увлекся. – Я понимаю, что вы хотите сказать, – спокойно промолвил Пуаро. – В какой-то степени я с вами согласен. Зло действительно ходит по земле, и это следует признать. – Раз уж об этом зашла речь, – откашлявшись, начал майор Барри. – В Индии эти мошенники факиры… Майор Барри пробыл в «Веселом Роджере» достаточно долго, и всем уже была известна его убийственная склонность пускаться в пространные воспоминания об Индии. Мисс Брюстер и миссис Редферн быстро заговорили разом. – Миссис Редферн, это ведь ваш муж плывет вон там, не так ли? Как мастерски он владеет кролем! Он великолепный пловец. В то же самое время миссис Редферн сказала: – О, посмотрите! Какая вон там очаровательная яхта под красными парусами! Она ведь принадлежит мистеру Блатту, не правда ли? Яхта под красными парусами как раз пересекала вход в бухту. – Странная это причуда – красные паруса, – проворчал майор Барри. Однако угроза рассказа о факирах была устранена. Эркюль Пуаро одобрительно наблюдал за молодым мужчиной, который только что подплыл к берегу. Патрик Редферн был всеобщим любимцем. Стройный, бронзовый от загара, с широкими плечами и узкими бедрами, он обладал заразительным весельем, а природная простота вызывала любовь всех без исключения женщин и большинства мужчин. Выйдя на берег, Патрик Редферн стряхнул с себя воду и весело помахал рукой жене. Та помахала ему в ответ. – Пэт, поднимайся к нам! – Уже иду! И он направился за своим полотенцем. В этот момент мимо прошла женщина, спускающаяся от пансионата к пляжу. Ее появление было сравнимо с выходом на сцену ведущей актрисы. Больше того, женщина держалась так, будто сознавала это. В ее поведении не было ни капли застенчивости. Казалось, она уже давно привыкла к тому, какой эффект неизменно производило ее присутствие. Высокая и стройная, она была в простом белом платье для купания с открытой спиной, и каждый квадратный дюйм ее тела был покрыт ровным бронзовым загаром. Она была совершенна, как статуя. Ее пышные золотисто-каштановые волосы ниспадали роскошными волнами на плечи. Лицо обладало некоторой излишней очерченностью, которая появляется после тридцати лет, однако в целом она производила впечатление молодости – бесконечного торжества жизненных сил. В ее лице была какая-то восточная неподвижность, свойственная китайцам; уголки темно-голубых глаз слегка задирались вверх. Голову венчала причудливая китайская шляпа из нефритово-зеленого картона. Было в ней нечто такое, отчего все остальные женщины на пляже словно потускнели и поблекли. И также неизбежно взгляды всех присутствующих мужчин обратились на нее. Глаза Эркюля Пуаро широко раскрылись, усики одобрительно изогнулись. Майор Барри выпрямился в шезлонге, и его глаза от возбуждения выпучились еще больше. Сидящий слева от Пуаро преподобный Стивен Лейн напрягся, со свистом втянув воздух. – Арлена Стюарт… вот как ее звали до того, как она вышла замуж за Маршалла, – хрипло прошептал майор Барри. – Я видел ее в «Прийти и уйти» до того, как она ушла со сцены. Есть на что посмотреть, а? – Она привлекательна – это у нее не отнять, – медленно произнесла холодным тоном Кристина Редферн. – Я считаю, что она похожа… на хищного зверя! – Месье Пуаро, вы только что говорили про зло, – быстро сказала Эмили Брюстер. – Так вот, на мой взгляд, эта женщина является олицетворением зла! Она насквозь порочна. Так получилось, что мне многое о ней известно. – Помню, в Симле была одна девчонка, – мечтательно произнес майор Барри. – У нее тоже были рыжие волосы. Жена младшего офицера. Можно ли сказать, что она перессорила всех и вся? А то как же! Мужчины сходили по ней с ума! А все женщины, естественно, жаждали выцарапать ей глаза! Много семей она разбила… – Он усмехнулся. – Ее муж был такой приятный, спокойный тип. Боготворил землю, по которой она ступала. Никогда ничего не замечал – или делал вид, что не замечал. – Такие женщины представляют угрозу… представляют угрозу… – тихим голосом, проникнутым глубоким чувством, начал Стивен Лейн и умолк. Арлена Стюарт подошла к кромке воды. Двое молодых парней, еще совсем мальчишек, вскочили и поспешили к ней. Она остановилась, улыбаясь. Ее взгляд скользнул мимо парней к идущему вдоль берега Патрику Редферну. Пуаро мысленно отметил, что это было все равно что наблюдать за стрелкой компаса. Патрик Редферн отклонился от курса, ноги сами собой повели его в другую сторону. Стрелка, невзирая ни на что, должна подчиняться законам магнетизма и всегда указывать на север. Ноги привели Патрика Редферна к Арлене Стюарт. Та стояла на месте, с улыбкой поджидая его. Затем она медленно двинулась по берегу вдоль самой кромки воды. Патрик Редферн последовал за ней. Арлена Стюарт вытянулась на камне. Патрик Редферн сел рядом с нею на гальке. Кристина Редферн гневно вскочила с места и направилась в пансионат. После ее ухода наступило неловкое молчание. – Плохо все это, – наконец сказала Эмили Брюстер. – Она просто прелесть. Они женаты всего год или два. – Та девчонка, о которой я рассказывал, – заметил майор Барри, – из Симлы… Она разбила пару счастливых семей. Больно было на это смотреть. – Есть такой тип женщин, – сказала мисс Брюстер, – которым нравится разрушать семьи. – Помолчав минуту-другую, она добавила: – Патрик Редферн дурак! Эркюль Пуаро ничего не сказал. Его взор был устремлен на пляж, но он смотрел не на Патрика Редферна и Арлену Стюарт. – Пожалуй, я пойду за своей лодкой, – сказала мисс Брюстер. С этими словами она ушла. Майор Барри с мягким любопытством обратил на детектива свои глаза, похожие на вареные ягоды крыжовника. – Ну, Пуаро, – сказал он, – о чем вы думаете? Вы рта не открыли. Что вы думаете об этой сирене? Горячая штучка! – C’est possible, – согласился Пуаро. – Ну же, старина! Знаю я вас, французов! – Я не француз, – холодно возразил Пуаро. – Все равно, не говорите мне, будто вам не нравятся хорошенькие девочки! Ну, что вы о ней думаете? – Она не так уж и молода, – подумав, сказал детектив. – Ну и что? Женщине столько лет, на сколько она выглядит. А она выглядит как надо. Эркюль Пуаро кивнул. – Да, она действительно красивая, – сказал он. – Но в конечном счете главное – не красота. Не красота заставляет головы всех мужчин – за исключением одного – поворачиваться вслед Арлене Стюарт. – Это ТО САМОЕ, старина! – воскликнул майор. – Вот что это – ТО САМОЕ! – Помолчав, он вдруг спросил с любопытством: – А вы куда так пристально смотрите? – Я смотрю на исключение, – ответил Пуаро. – На того единственного мужчину, который не поднял взгляд на проходившую мимо Арлену Стюарт. Проследив за его взглядом, майор Барри увидел мужчину лет сорока, светловолосого и загорелого. У него было спокойное приятное лицо. Он сидел, попыхивая трубкой, и читал «Таймс». – А, этот! – воскликнул майор Барри. – Так это ж ее муж, старина! Это же Маршалл! – Да, знаю, – спокойно произнес Пуаро. Майор Барри хмыкнул. Сам он был холостяком и привык разделять мужей на три вида: «Препятствие», «Неудобство» и «Ширма». – По-моему, отличный парень, – сказал он. – Спокойный. Интересно, а мне уже принесли «Таймс»? – И, встав, майор направился в пансионат. Пуаро медленно перевел взгляд на Стивена Лейна. Священник пристально смотрел на Арлену Маршалл и Патрика Редферна. Внезапно он повернулся к Пуаро. Его глаза вспыхнули суровым фанатичным огнем. – Эта женщина – воплощенное Зло, – сказал он. – Вы в этом сомневаетесь? – Трудно сказать, – медленно произнес детектив. – Но, боже мой, разве вы не чувствуете это в воздухе? Повсюду? Присутствие Зла. Пуаро медленно кивнул. Chapter 2 When Rosamund Darnley came and sat down by him, Hercule Poirot made no attempt to disguise his pleasure. As he has since admitted, he admired Rosamund Darnley as much as any woman he had ever met. He liked her distinction, the graceful lines of her figure, the alert proud carriage of her head. He liked the neat sleek waves of her dark hair and the ironic quality of her smile. She was wearing a dress of some navy blue material with touches of white. It looked very simple owing to the expensive severity of its line. Rosamund Darnley as Rose Mond Ltd was one of London’s best-known dressmakers. She said: “I don’t think I like this place. I’m wondering why I came here!” “You’ve been here before, have you not?” “Yes, two years ago, at Easter. There weren’t so many people then.” Hercule Poirot looked at her. He said gently: “Something has occurred to worry you. That is right, is it not?” She nodded. Her foot swung to and fro. She stared down at it. She said: “I’ve met a ghost. That’s what it is.” “A ghost, Mademoiselle?” “Yes.” “The ghost of what? Or of whom?” “Oh, the ghost of myself.” Poirot asked gently: “Was it a painful ghost?” “Unexpectedly painful. It took me back, you know.” She paused, musing. Then she said: “Imagine my childhood – No, you can’t. You’re not English!” Poirot asked: “Was it a very English childhood?” “Oh, incredibly so! The country – a big shabby house – horses, dogs – walks in the rain – wood fires – apples in the orchard – lack of money – old tweeds – evening dresses that went on from year to year – a neglected garden – with Michaelmas daisies coming out like great banners in the Autumn…” Poirot asked gently: “And you want to go back?” Rosamund Darnley shook her head. She said: “One can’t go back, can one? That – never. But I’d like to have gone on – a different way.” Poirot said: “I wonder.” Rosamund Darnley laughed. “So do I really!” Poirot said: “When I was young (and that, Mademoiselle, is indeed a long time ago) there was a game entitled ‘if not yourself, who would you be?’ One wrote the answer in young ladies’ albums. They had gold edges and were bound in blue leather. The answer, Mademoiselle, is not really very easy to find.” Rosamund said: “No – I suppose not. It would be a big risk. One wouldn’t like to take on being Mussolini or Princess Elizabeth. As for one’s friends, one knows too much about them. I remember once meeting a charming husband and wife. They were so courteous and delightful to one another and seemed on such good terms after years of marriage that I envied the woman. I’d have changed places with her willingly. Somebody told me afterwards that in private they’d never spoken to each other for eleven years!” She laughed. “That shows, doesn’t it, that you never know?” After a moment or two Poirot said: “Many people. Mademoiselle, must envy you.” Rosamund Darnley said coolly: “Oh – yes. Naturally.” She thought about it, her lips curved upward in their ironic smile. “Yes, I’m really the perfect type of the successful woman! I enjoy the artistic satisfaction of the successful creative artist (I really do like designing clothes) and the financial satisfaction of the successful business woman. I’m very well off, I’ve a good figure, a passable face, and a not too malicious tongue.” She paused. Her smile widened. “Of course – I haven’t got a husband! I’ve failed there, haven’t I, M. Poirot?” Poirot said gallantly: “Mademoiselle, if you are not married, it is because none of my sex have been sufficiently eloquent. It is from choice, not necessity, that you remain single.” Rosamund Darnley said: “And yet, like all men, I’m sure you believe in your heart that no woman is content unless she is married and has children.” Poirot shrugged his shoulders. “To marry and have children that is the common lot of women. Only one woman in a hundred – more, in a thousand – can make for herself a name and a position as you have done.” Rosamund grinned at him. “And yet, all the same, I’m nothing but a wretched old maid! That’s what I feel today, at any rate. I’d be happier with a twopence a year and a big silent brute of a husband and a brood of brats running after me. That’s true, isn’t it?” Poirot shrugged his shoulders. “Since you say so, then, yes, Mademoiselle.” Rosamund laughed, her equilibrium suddenly restored. She took out a cigarette and lit it. She said: “You certainly know how to deal with women, M. Poirot. I now feel like taking the opposite point of view and arguing with you in favour of careers for women. Of course I’m damned well off as I am – and I know it!” “Then everything in the garden – or shall we say at the seaside? – is lovely, Mademoiselle.” “Quite right.” Poirot, in his turn, extracted his cigarette case and lit one of those tiny cigarettes which it was his affectation to smoke. Regarding the ascending haze with a quizzical eye, he murmured: “So Mr – no, Captain – Marshall is an old friend of yours, Mademoiselle?” Rosamund sat up. She said: “Now how do you know that? Oh, I suppose Ken told you.” Poirot shook his head. “Nobody has told me anything. After all, Mademoiselle, I am a detective. It was the obvious conclusion to draw.” Rosamund Darnley said: “I don’t see it.” “But consider!” The little man’s hands were eloquent. “You have been here a week. You are lively, gay, without a care. Today, suddenly, you speak of ghosts, of old times. What has happened? For several days there have been no new arrivals until last night when Captain Marshall and his wife and daughter arrive. Today the change! It is obvious!” Rosamund Darnley said: “Well, it’s true enough. Kenneth Marshall and I were more or less children together. The Marshalls lived next door to us. Ken was always nice to me – although condescending, of course, since he was four years older. I’ve not seen anything of him for a long time. It must be – fifteen years at least.” Poirot said thoughtfully: “A long time.” Rosamund nodded. There was a pause and then Hercule Poirot said: “He is sympathetic, yes?” Rosamund said warmly: “Ken’s a dear. One of the best. Frightfully quiet and reserved. I’d say his only fault is a penchant for making unfortunate marriages.” Poirot said in a tone of great understanding: “Ah…” Rosamund Darnley went on. “Kenneth’s a fool – an utter fool where women are concerned! Do you remember the Martingdale case?” Poirot frowned. “Martingdale? Martingdale? Arsenic, was it not?” “Yes. Seventeen or eighteen years ago. The woman was tried for the murder of her husband.” “And he was proved to have been an arsenic eater and she was acquitted?” “That’s right. Well, after her acquittal, Ken married her. That’s the sort of damn silly thing he does.” Hercule Poirot murmured: “But if she was innocent?” Rosamund Darnley said impatiently: “Oh, I daresay she was innocent. Nobody really knows! But there are plenty of women to marry in the world without going out of your way to marry one who’s stood trial for murder.” Poirot said nothing. Perhaps he knew that if he kept silence Rosamund Darnley would go on. She did so. “He was very young, of course, only just twenty-one. He was crazy about her. She died when Linda was born – a year after their marriage. I believe Ken was terribly cut up by her death. Afterwards he racketed around a lot – trying to forget, I suppose.” She paused. “And then came this business of Arlena Stuart. She was in Revue at the time. There was the Codrington divorce case. Lady Codrington divorced Codrington citing Arlena Stuart. They say Lord Codrington was absolutely infatuated with her. It was understood they were to be married as soon as the decree was made absolute. Actually, when it came to it, he didn’t marry her. Turned her down flat. I believe she actually sued him for breach of promise. Anyway, the thing made a big stir at the time. The next thing that happens is that Ken goes and marries her. The fool – the complete fool!” Hercule Poirot murmured: “A man might be excused such a folly – she is beautiful, Mademoiselle.” “Yes, there’s no doubt of that. There was another scandal about three years ago. Old Sir Roger Erskine left her every penny of his money. I should have thought that would have opened Ken’s eyes if anything would.” “And did it not?” Rosamund Darnley shrugged her shoulders. “I tell you I’ve seen nothing of him for years. People say, though, that he took it with absolute equanimity. Why I should like to know? Has he got an absolutely blind belief in her?’” “There might be other reasons.” “Yes. Pride! Keeping a stiff upper lip! I don’t know what he really feels about her. Nobody does.” “And she? What does she feel about him?” Rosamund stared at him. She said: “She? She’s the world’s first gold-digger. And a man eater as well! If anything personable in trousers comes within a hundred yards of her, it’s fresh sport for Arlena! She’s that kind.” Poirot nodded his head slowly in complete agreement. “Yes,” he said. “That is true what you say… Her eyes look for one thing only – men.” Rosamund said: “She’s got her eye on Patrick Redfern now. He’s a good-looking man – and rather the simple kind – you know, fond of his wife, and not a philanderer. That’s the kind that’s meat and drink to Arlena. I like little Mrs Redfern – she’s nice-looking in her fair washed-out way – but I don’t think she’ll stand a dog’s chance against the man-eating tiger, Arlena.” Poirot said: “No, it is as you say.” He looked distressed. Rosamund said: “Christine Redfern was a school teacher, I believe. She’s the kind that thinks that mind has a pull over matter. She’s got a rude shock coming to her.” Poirot shook his head vexedly. Rosamund got up. She said: “It’s a shame, you know.” She added vaguely: “Somebody ought to do something about it.” Linda Marshall was examining her face dispassionately in her bedroom mirror. She disliked her face very much. At this minute it seemed to her to be mostly bones and freckles. She noted with distaste her heavy bush of red-brown hair (mouse, she called it in her own mind), her greenish-grey eyes, her high cheekbones and the long aggressive line of the chin. Her mouth and teeth weren’t perhaps quite so bad – but what were teeth after all? And was that a spot coming on the side of her nose? She decided with relief that it wasn’t a spot. She thought to herself: “It’s awful to be sixteen – simply awful.” One didn’t, somehow, know where one was. Linda was as awkward as a young colt and as prickly as a hedgehog. She was conscious the whole time of her ungainliness and of the fact that she was neither one thing nor the other. It hadn’t been so bad at school. But now she had left school. Nobody seemed to know quite what she was going to do next. Her father talked vaguely of sending her to Paris next winter. Linda didn’t want to go to Paris – but then she didn’t want to be at home either. She’d never realized properly, somehow, until now, how very much she disliked Arlena. Linda’s young face grew tense, her green eyes hardened. Arlena… She thought to herself: “She’s a beast – a beast…” Stepmothers! It was rotten to have a stepmother, everybody said so. And it was true! Not that Arlena was unkind to her. Most of the time she hardly noticed the girl. But when she did, there was a contemptuous amusement in her glance, in her words. The finished grace and poise of Arlena’s movements emphasized Linda’s own adolescent clumsiness. With Arlena about, one felt, shamingly, just how immature and crude one was. But it wasn’t that only. No, it wasn’t only that. Linda groped haltingly in the recesses of her mind. She wasn’t very good at sorting out her emotions and labelling them. It was something that Arlena did to people – to the house — “She’s bad,” thought Linda with decision. “She’s quite, quite bad.” But you couldn’t even leave it at that. You couldn’t just elevate your nose with a sniff of moral superiority and dismiss her from your mind. It was something she did to people. Father, now. Father was quite different… She puzzled over it. Father coming down to take her out from school. Father taking her once for a cruise. And Father at home – with Arlena there. All – all sort of bottled up and not – and not there. Linda thought: “And it’ll go on like this. Day after day – month after month. I can’t bear it.” Life stretched before her – endless – in a series of days darkened and poisoned by Arlena’s presence. She was childish enough still to have little sense of proportion. A year, to Linda, seemed like an eternity. A big dark burning wave of hatred against Arlena surged up in her mind. She thought: “I’d like to kill her. Oh! I wish she’d die…” She looked out above the mirror onto the sea below. This place was really rather fun. Or it could be fun. All those beaches and coves and queer little paths. Lots to explore. And places where one could go off by oneself and muck about. There were caves, too, so the Cowan boys had told her. Linda thought: “If only Arlena would go away, I could enjoy myself.” Her mind went back to the evening of their arrival. It had been exciting coming coming from the mainland. The tide had been up over the causeway. They had come in a boat. The hotel had looked exciting, unusual. And then on the terrace a tall dark woman had jumped up and said: “Why, Kenneth!” And her father, looking frightfully surprised, had exclaimed: “Rosamund!” Linda considered Rosamund Darnley severely and critically in the manner of youth. She decided that she approved of Rosamund. Rosamund, she thought, was sensible. And her hair grew nicely – as though it fitted her – most people’s hair didn’t fit them. And her clothes were nice. And she had a kind of funny amused face – as though it were amused at herself not at you. Rosamund had been nice to her, Linda. She hadn’t been gushing or said things. (Under the term of “saying things” Linda grouped a mass of miscellaneous dislikes.) And Rosamund hadn’t looked as though she thought Linda a fool. In fact she’d treated Linda as though she were a real human being. Linda so seldom felt like a real human being that she was deeply grateful when any one appeared to consider her one. Father, too, had seemed pleased to see Miss Darnley. Funny – he’d looked quite different, all of a sudden. He’d looked – he’d looked – Linda puzzled it out – why, young, that was it! He’d laughed – a queer boyish laugh. Now Linda came to think of it, she’d very seldom heard him laugh. She felt puzzled. It was as though she’d got a glimpse of quite a different person. She thought: “I wonder what Father was like when he was my age…” But that was too difficult. She gave it up. An idea flashed across her mind. What fun it would have been if they’d come here and found Miss Darnley here – just she and Father. A vista opened out just for a minute. Father, boyish and laughing. Miss Darnley, herself – and all the fun one could have on the island – bathing – caves – The blackness shut down again. Arlena. One couldn’t enjoy oneself with Arlena about. Why not? Well, she, Linda, couldn’t, anyway. You couldn’t be happy when there was a person there you – hated. Yes, hated. She hated Arlena. Very slowly that black burning wave of hatred rose up again. Linda’s face went very white. Her lips parted a little. The pupils of her eyes contracted. And her fingers stiffened and clenched themselves… Kenneth Marshall tapped on his wife’s door. When her voice answered, he opened the door and went in. Arlena was just putting the finishing touches on her toilet. She was dressed in glittering green and looked a little like a mermaid. She was standing in front of the glass applying mascara to her eyelashes. She said: “Oh, it’s you. Ken.” “Yes. I wondered if you were ready.” “Just a minute.” Kenneth Marshall strolled to the window. He looked out on the sea. His face, as usual, displayed no emotion of any kind. It was pleasant and ordinary. Turning around, he said: “Arlena?” “Yes?” “You’ve met Redfern before, I gather?” Arlena said easily: “Oh, yes, darling. At a cocktail party somewhere. I thought he was rather a pet.” Конец ознакомительного фрагмента. Текст предоставлен ООО «ЛитРес». Прочитайте эту книгу целиком, купив полную легальную версию (https://www.litres.ru/pages/biblio_book/?art=51882228&lfrom=334617187) на ЛитРес. Безопасно оплатить книгу можно банковской картой Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, со счета мобильного телефона, с платежного терминала, в салоне МТС или Связной, через PayPal, WebMoney, Яндекс.Деньги, QIWI Кошелек, бонусными картами или другим удобным Вам способом.
КУПИТЬ И СКАЧАТЬ ЗА: 199.00 руб.