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Алиса в Зазеркалье / Through the Looking-glass, and What Alice Found There

Алиса в Зазеркалье / Through the Looking-glass, and What Alice Found There
Алиса в Зазеркалье / Through the Looking-glass, and What Alice Found There Lewis Carroll Легко читаем по-английски В книгу вошел сокращенный и упрощенный текст сказки Л. Кэрролла о девочке Алисе, чудесным образом оказавшейся в удивительном мире Зазеркалья. Путешествуя по зазеркальному миру, Алиса попадает в самые невероятные ситуации, знакомится с фантастическими существами и… даже становится королевой! Текст сказки сопровождается комментариями, упражнениями на проверку понимания прочитанного, а также небольшим словарем, облегчающим чтение. Предназначается для начинающих изучать английский язык (уровень 1 – Elementary). Льюис Кэрролл / Lewis Carroll Алиса в Зазеркалье / Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There © Положенцева Д. В., адаптация текста, комментарии, упражнения, словарь © ООО «Издательство АСТ», 2019 Chapter 1 Looking-Glass House Alice was sitting in the great armchair, half talking to herself and half asleep. One of her kittens, Kitty, was playing with a ball of yarn, rolling it up and down on the floor. The whole room was in a mess[1 - to be in a mess – быть в беспорядке]. “Oh, you wicked little thing!”[2 - Oh, you wicked little thing! – Ах ты маленькая негодница!] cried Alice and caught the kitten. She gave it a little kiss. “Where are your manners? Dinah has to teach you how to behave!” She sat down and began to wind up the ball again. Kitty sat next to her and watched the process. “Oh, I was so angry, Kitty,” Alice went on, “when I saw all the mischief you have done! What have you got to say for yourself? [3 - to say for yourself – сказать в свое оправдание]I will punish you some day!” After a while Alice talked to the kitten again. “Oh, Kitty, can you play chess? Don’t smile, my dear, I’m asking you seriously. Kitty, dear, let’s pretend …” “Let’s pretend …” was Alice’s favourite phrase. “Let’s pretend that you’re the Red Queen! I think if you sit like this, you’ll look exactly like her. Try, dear!” And Alice took the Red Queen and showed it to the kitten. But the kitten couldn’t sit properly. In order to punish it, Alice held it up to the Looking-glass. “If you’re not good,” she said, “I’ll put you through into Looking-glass House. How would you like that? Would you like to live in Looking-glass House, Kitty? I wonder if they would give you milk there. Let’s pretend we can find a way into it, Kitty. Look, it’s turning into a sort of mist! It will be easy to get through …” In another moment Alice was through the glass, and jumped down into the Looking-glass room. She began looking about. She noticed some chessmen on the floor and thought that it wasn’t very tidy there. But in another moment, she saw that they were alive! The chessmen were walking about! “Here are the Red King and the Red Queen,” Alice whispered, “and there are the White King and the White Queen … I don’t think they can hear me!” she went on, as she put her head closer down. “And I’m sure they can’t see me. I feel as if I were invisible …” Something began squeaking on the table behind Alice, and she turned her head and saw that one of the White Pawns fell down. “It is the voice of my child!” the White Queen cried out. “My dear Lily!” Alice wanted to help the White Queen, and she picked up the Queen and set her on the table next to her noisy little daughter. That frightened the White Queen and for a minute or two she could do nothing but hug the little Lily in silence. But then she cried, “Mind the volcano!”[4 - Mind the volcano! – Берегись вулкана!] “What volcano?” said the White King. “It blew me up,” said the White Queen, who was still frightened. Alice watched the White King. She said, “I will help you!” She picked him up very gently, and lifted him. But, before she put him on the table, she began cleaning him—he was very dirty because of ashes. Of course, he was frightened too—he was hanging in the air and something was cleaning him! Alice set him on the table near the Queen. When the White King recovered, he started talking to the Queen in a frightened whisper. Alice could barely hear what they were saying. The King said: “I turned cold to the very ends of my whiskers!” “You haven’t got any whiskers,” the Queen said. “This horrible moment,” the King went on, “I will never, never forget!” There was a book near Alice on the table, and she opened it and read. YKCOWREBBAJ sevot yhtils eht dna ,gillirb sawT‘ ebaw eht ni elbmig dna eryg diD ,sevogorob eht erew ysmim llA .ebargtuo shtar emom eht dnA At first she was puzzled very much, but then she understood everything. “It’s a Looking-glass book, of course! And if I hold it up to a glass, the words will all go the right way again.” This was the poem that Alice read. JABBERWOCKY ’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe.[5 - Стихотворный нонсенс. В переводе на русский язык Д. Г. Орловской:БАРМАГЛОТ БАРМАГЛОТ - Варкалось. Хливкие шорькиПырялись по наве,И хрюкотали зелюки,Как мюмзики в мове.] “It is very pretty,” Alice said, “but it’s very hard to understand!” Suddenly, she thought she wanted see the rest of the house. She decided to start with the garden. Exercises 1. Choose the right variant: 1. Alice was sleeping in the great arm-chair. 2. Alice was talking to herself and to the kitten. 3. Alice was doing her homework. 4. Alice was reading a book. 2. Why was Alice angry with the kitten? 1. The kitten was very noisy. 2. The kitten played with the ball of yarn. 3. The room was in a mess while the kitten was playing with the ball of yarn. 4. The kitten was very dirty. 3. What was Alice’s favourite phrase? 1. Let’s play… 2. Let’s build a snowman! 3. Let’s go for a walk! 4. Let’s pretend… 4. What time of the year was it? 1. Winter 2. Summer 3. Spring 4. Autumn 5. Choose the right variant: 1. Alice was frightened and wanted to come back home. 2. Alice was invisible and chessmen couldn’t see and hear her. 3. Alice made friends with the chessmen. 4. Alice helped the White King and he thanked her. 6. Did Alice understand anything in the poem? 1. Yes, she understood everything. 2. She understood only the part of it. 3. No, she didn’t understand it at all. 4. No, she didn’t understand it, but her head was filled with some ideas. 7. Complete the sentences with these expressions: say for yourself, make a note of, for its own good, arm in arm 1. The White castles were walking about the room …………. 2. ‘Kitty, what can you …………? I’m going to tell you all your faults!’ 3. The White King wanted to ………… what had happened. 4. Dinah washed the face of the kitten, but Snowdrop understood that it was …………. 8. Insert the right prepositions: out, up, into, on, through 1. She sat back ……… the arm-chair. 2. You can see a room ……… the glass… it’s just the same as our living room. 3. She picked ……… the Queen and set her ……… the table to her noisy little daughter. 4. The King took a big note-book ……… of his pocket, and began writing. 9. Complete the table: Chapter 2 The Garden of Live Flowers “I will see the garden better,” said Alice to herself, “if I get to the top of that hill.” And she followed the path, but it always came back to the house. “No!” Alice said, looking up at the house. “I don’t want to go in yet!” She went to the hill again. This time she walked past a large flower-bed. “O Tiger-lily,” said Alice to one flower, “I wish you could talk![6 - I wish you could talk! – Жаль, что вы не умеете разговаривать!]” “We can talk,” said the Tiger-lily, “when there is someone to talk to[7 - when there is someone to talk to – когда есть с кем поговорить].” Alice was so surprised that she could not speak for a minute. Then she asked, “And can all the flowers talk?” “Yes, as well as you can,” said the Tiger-lily. “Are you frightened that nobody takes care of you[8 - nobody takes care of you – никто не заботиться о вас]?” “There’s the tree in the middle,” said the Rose, “what else is it good for?” “But what can it do, if any danger comes?” Alice asked. “It can bark[9 - bark – слово-омоним: лаять; кора (зд. игра слов)],” said the Rose. “Didn’t you know that?” cried another Daisy. “How can you talk so well?” Alice asked. “I visited many gardens, but flowers couldn’t talk.” “Put your hand down, and feel the ground,” said the Tiger-lily. “Then you’ll know why.” Alice did so. “It’s very hard,” she said. “In most gardens,” the Tiger-lily said, “the flower-beds are too soft … so that the flowers are always asleep.” This sounded like a very good reason. “I never thought of that before!” said Alice. “Are there any more people in the garden besides me?” “There’s one other flower in the garden that can move like you,” said the Rose. Alice thought there was another little girl in the garden somewhere. “Does she ever come here?” she asked. “I think you will see her soon,” said the Rose. “She has thorns.” “Where does she wear the thorns?” Alice asked with some curiosity. “All round her head, of course,” the Rose replied. “I wonder why you haven’t got them. Oh, she’s coming! I hear her footsteps!” Alice looked round, and saw that it was the Red Queen. She decided to talk to her. “You can’t do that,” said the Rose. “You should walk the other way[10 - You should walk the other way. – Тебе следует идти в обратную сторону.].” “Nonsense”, Alice thought, so she said nothing, and went towards the Red Queen. “Where do you come from?” asked the Red Queen. “And where are you going? Look up, speak nicely, and don’t twiddle your fingers!” Alice explained that she was lost. “But why did you come here at all? Curtsey while you’re thinking what to say, it saves time[11 - Curtsey while you’re thinking what to say, it saves time – Делай реверанс, пока думаешь, что сказать – это экономит время.].” “I only wanted to see the garden, your Majesty … and I thought I’d try and find my way to the top of that hill …” “When you say ‘hill’,” the Queen said, “I can show you hills, in comparison with which you will call that a valley.” Alice curtseyed again, because she was afraid that the Queen could be offended. And they walked on in silence and reached the top of the little hill. For some time Alice stood and said nothing, looking out in all directions over the country. “It is just like a large chess-board!” Alice said at last. “It’s a great huge game of chess. Oh, what fun it is! I would like even to be a Pawn, if only I can join … although, of course, I’d like to be a Queen!” The Red Queen only smiled, and said, “That’s easy. You can be the White Queen’s Pawn, if you like. You’re in the Second Square: when you get to the Eighth Square you’ll be a Queen … ” Just at this moment they began to run. They were running hand in hand, and the Queen went very fast and she cried to Alice “Faster! Faster!” Alice felt that she could not go faster. The most curious thing was, that the trees and the other things round them never changed their places at all! The Queen kept crying [12 - kept crying – продолжала кричать]“Faster! Faster!” “Are we nearly there?” Alice asked at last. “Nearly there!” the Queen said. “Faster! Now! Now!” And they went so fast that they hardly touched the ground with their feet! Suddenly they stopped. The Queen said kindly, “You may rest a little now.” Alice looked round her in great surprise. “We have been under this tree the whole time! Nothing changed!” “Of course,” said the Queen. “Here we have to run in order to stay in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run faster!” Alice did not know what to say, but the Queen did not wait for an answer. “You know that a pawn goes two squares in its first move. So you will go very quickly through the Third Square … by train[13 - by train – поездом], I think. Well, the Fourth Square belongs to Tweedledum and Tweedledee[14 - Tweedledum and Tweedledee – Труляля и Траляля (персонажи книги)]. The Fifth one is covered with water. The Sixth Square belongs to Humpty Dumpty[15 - Humpty Dumpty – Шалтай-Болтай (персонаж книги)]. The Seventh Square is a forest. One of the Knights will show you the way. And in the Eighth Square we will be Queens together, and have a lot of fun!” Alice got up and curtseyed, and sat down again. The Red Queen said “good-bye,” and then disappeared. And Alice began to remember that she was a Pawn, and soon she would make a move. Exercises 1. Why could the flowers talk? 1. The flowers were magical. 2. The flowers learnt a lot from the books. 3. People talked to them very often. 4. The ground was hard, so the flowers were not asleep all the time. 2. What flowers were the noisiest? 1. Daisies 2. Roses 3. Violets 4. Lilies 3. Point out what directions the Red Queen gave to Alice. 1. Look up, speak nicely, and don’t twiddle your fingers! 2. Don’t be so shy and speak first! 3. Curtsey while you‘re thinking what to say, it saves time. 4. Call me Madam! 5. Turn out your toes as you walk… and remember who you are! 4. What chessman did Alice want to be? 1. A castle 2. A pawn 3. A queen 4. A knight 5. What were Alice and the Queen doing to stay under the tree? 1. They were jumping. 2. They were running. 3. They were counting. 4. They were crawling. 6. What would be in the Eighth Square? 1. Alice would meet a Knight. 2. Alice would return home. 3. Humpty-Dumpty would have a conversation with her. 4. Alice would be a Queen too, and all the Queens would have a lot of fun. 7. Complete the sentences with these expressions: takes care of, by train, kept crying, vanished into the air, I wish 1. ‘Are you frightened that nobody ……………… you? 2. So you will go very quickly through the Third Square. ………………, I think. 3. The Queen …………… ‘Faster! Faster!’. 4. ‘O Tiger-lily,’ said Alice to one flower, ‘………………you could talk!’ 5. Alice …………… that she was a Pawn, and soon she would make a move. 8. Complete the table: Chapter 3 Looking-Glass Insects Alice wanted to go to the Third Square. So she ran down the hill and got on a train. “Tickets, please!” said the Guard. “Now then! Show your ticket, child!” the Guard went on, looking angrily at Alice. “I haven’t got a ticket,” Alice said, “there wasn’t a ticket-office [16 - ticket-office – касса]where I came from.” “Don’t make excuses[17 - Don’t make excuses! – Не оправдывайся!],” said the Guard. He was looking at her, first through a telescope, then through a microscope, and then through an opera-glass[18 - opera-glass – бинокль]. At last he said, “You’re travelling the wrong way,” and went away. “A child,” said the gentleman sitting next to her (he was dressed in white paper), “should know which way she’s going, even if she doesn’t know her own name!” A Goat, that was sitting next to the gentleman, said in a loud voice, “She has to know her way to the ticket-office, even if she doesn’t know her alphabet!” And after that other voices went on, “She must go by post …”, “She must be sent as a message by the telegraph …” and so on. Alice began. “I was in a wood just now, and I wish I could get back there.” But at that moment there was a shrill scream from the engine[19 - a shrill scream from the engine – пронзительный свисток паровоза], and everybody jumped up. The Horse said, “It’s only a brook and we have to jump it over.” Alice was nervous. In another moment the carriage rose up into the air … And the next moment she was sitting under a tree with the Gnat [20 - gnat – комар]from the train. It was sitting on a branch over her head. It was an enormous Gnat. “About the size of a chicken,” Alice thought. “You don’t like insects?” the Gnat asked. “I like them when they can talk,” Alice said. “They don’t talk, where I come from.” “What kind of insects do you like from where you come from?” the Gnat asked. “I don’t like them at all,” Alice explained, “because I’m afraid of them … at least the large kinds. But I can tell you the names of some of them.” “Do they answer to their names?” the Gnat asked. “I don’t know …” “What’s the use of having names[21 - What’s the use of having names – В чем же смысл имен]” the Gnat said, “if they won’t answer to them?” “It’s useful to the people who name them. If not, why do things have names at all?” “I can’t say,” the Gnat said. “Here they’ve got no names.” After this, Alice was silent for a minute or two. The Gnat asked, “I think you don’t want to lose your name.” “No, I don’t,” Alice said. She was a little nervous. “Only think how nice it would be if you could go home without a name! For example, if the governess wanted to call you to your lessons, she would say “come here … ,” and there she would have to stop, because she didn’t know your name, and of course you wouldn’t have to go, you know.” “That would never happen, I’m sure,” said Alice. “If she couldn’t remember my name, she’d call me ‘Miss!’.” “Well, if she said ‘Miss,’ and didn’t say anything more,” the Gnat said, “of course you’d miss [22 - miss – слово-омоним: Мисс (как обращение), пропускать (зд. игра слов)]your lessons. That’s a joke.” Alice looked up, but the Gnat wasn’t there! Alice got up and walked on. Soon she came to an open field, with a wood on the other side: it looked much darker than the last wood, and Alice was a little afraid. However, she decided to go on. This was the only way to the Eighth Square. “Maybe this is the wood,” she said to herself, “where things have no names. I wonder what’ll become of my name when I go in?” She reached the wood. It was very cool there. Once in the wood, she suddenly realized that she forgot her name! Just then a Fawn [23 - fawn – лань]came out. It looked at Alice with its large gentle eyes. It wasn’t frightened. “What’s your name?” the Fawn said at last. “I wish I knew!” thought poor Alice. She answered, rather sadly, “I don’t know.” “Think again,” it said, “that won’t do[24 - that won’t do – так дело не пойдет].” Alice thought, but nothing came of it. “Please, would you tell me what is your name?” she said. “I think it can help me.” “I’ll tell you, but not here,” the Fawn said. “I can’t remember.” So they walked on together through the wood. They came out into another field, and here the Fawn said, “I’m a Fawn! And you’re a human child!” and in another moment it ran away. Alice stood looking after it. “I know my name now.” she said, “Alice … Alice … I won’t forget it again! And now, which way should I go?” It was not very difficult, because there was only one road through the wood. She went on and on, but then she saw two finger-posts [25 - finger-posts – дорожные указатели]which were pointing the same way. One was marked “To Tweedledum’s house and the other “To the house of Tweedledee. “I think,” said Alice at last, “that they live in the same house!” So she went on, till she saw two fat little men. It was so sudden! But in another moment she understood that they were Tweedledum and Tweedledee. Exercises 1. Choose the right statement: 1. Alice didn’t like the Fawn. 2. Alice lost her ticket to the train. 3. Alice forgot her name in the wood. 4. Alice loved the insects very much. 2. Why was the Guard so angry with Alice? 1. She didn’t have a ticket. 2. She was very noisy. 3. She had a lot of luggage. 4. She forgot her name. 3. Did Alice like insects? 1. Yes, she liked them, especially big insects. 2. Yes, she liked them, because they could talk. 3. No, she didn’t like them, because she was afraid of them. 4. No, she didn’t like them, because they could talk. 4. Why couldn’t Alice and the Fawn remember their names? 1. They had no names at all. 2. They had a vey bad memory. 3. Somebody stole their names. 4. They were in the wood, where all the things had no names. 5. Find the right statement: 1. Alice was happy when the Fawn ran away, because it was very ugly. 2. The Fawn was afraid of Alice and ran away. 3. The Fawn wasn’t afraid of Alice and it helped Alice to remember her name. 4. Alice was sad when the Fawn ran away, because she didn’t know her name. 6. Was it easy to find a way out of the wood? 1. Yes, it was. There was only one road in the wood. 2. Yes, it was. There were a lot of finger-points in the wood. 3. No, it wasn’t. There were a lot of twisting roads in the wood. 4. No, it wasn’t. Nobody wanted to help Alice. 7. Insert the right prepositions: in, at, next to, to, for 1. Alice was silent …… a minute or two. 2. It looked …… Alice with its large gentle eyes. 3. A Goat was sitting …… the gentleman …… white. 4. ‘I certainly won’t go back’, she thought to herself, and this was the only way …… the Eighth Square. 8. Complete the table: Chapter 4 Tweedledum and Tweedledee They were standing under a tree, each with an arm round the other’s neck. Alice knew which was which, because one of them had “dum” on his collar, and the other “dee”. “I think they’ve got “Tweedle” at the back of the collar,” she said to herself. She wanted to look if the word “Tweedle” was written at the back of each collar, when one, who had “dum”, said, “If you think we’re statues made of wax, you should pay!” “And,” added the one, who had “dee” Конец ознакомительного фрагмента. Текст предоставлен ООО «ЛитРес». Прочитайте эту книгу целиком, купив полную легальную версию (https://www.litres.ru/pages/biblio_book/?art=45114064&lfrom=334617187) на ЛитРес. Безопасно оплатить книгу можно банковской картой Visa, MasterCard, Maestro, со счета мобильного телефона, с платежного терминала, в салоне МТС или Связной, через PayPal, WebMoney, Яндекс.Деньги, QIWI Кошелек, бонусными картами или другим удобным Вам способом. notes Примечания 1 to be in a mess – быть в беспорядке 2 Oh, you wicked little thing! – Ах ты маленькая негодница! 3 to say for yourself – сказать в свое оправдание 4 Mind the volcano! – Берегись вулкана! 5 Стихотворный нонсенс. В переводе на русский язык Д. Г. Орловской: БАРМАГЛОТ БАРМАГЛОТ Варкалось. Хливкие шорьки Пырялись по наве, И хрюкотали зелюки, Как мюмзики в мове. 6 I wish you could talk! – Жаль, что вы не умеете разговаривать! 7 when there is someone to talk to – когда есть с кем поговорить 8 nobody takes care of you – никто не заботиться о вас 9 bark – слово-омоним: лаять; кора (зд. игра слов) 10 You should walk the other way. – Тебе следует идти в обратную сторону. 11 Curtsey while you’re thinking what to say, it saves time – Делай реверанс, пока думаешь, что сказать – это экономит время. 12 kept crying – продолжала кричать 13 by train – поездом 14 Tweedledum and Tweedledee – Труляля и Траляля (персонажи книги) 15 Humpty Dumpty – Шалтай-Болтай (персонаж книги) 16 ticket-office – касса 17 Don’t make excuses! – Не оправдывайся! 18 opera-glass – бинокль 19 a shrill scream from the engine – пронзительный свисток паровоза 20 gnat – комар 21 What’s the use of having names – В чем же смысл имен 22 miss – слово-омоним: Мисс (как обращение), пропускать (зд. игра слов) 23 fawn – лань 24 that won’t do – так дело не пойдет 25 finger-posts – дорожные указатели
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